Author Topic: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!  (Read 8395 times)

CreepysFan

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #75 on: January 13, 2014, 11:03:32 PM »
But there's no evil presented in any of the pictures I posted.
 
Maybe not, but the pics definitely raised ..... the devil.  :o
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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #76 on: October 12, 2017, 09:16:05 AM »
Of course!





The above title is part of any well-read man's library.


cl:)
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 09:30:17 AM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #77 on: October 12, 2017, 09:28:17 AM »
I just had some highlights put in for a formal reception at the dean's residence:





 :)
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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #78 on: January 17, 2019, 11:00:33 AM »
A complicating factor in any discussions of the supernatural is that natural phenomena that we don't fully understand and thus can't easily explain are frequently lumped in with supernatural phenomena. There have been innumerable cases of this happening over the ages. For example, the daily appearance of the sun in the east and its setting in the west was once seen as the celestial intervention of Apollo in his fiery chariot. We have now learned enough to understand that there is a more mundane natural explanation for the sun's seeming journey across the sky.

But we are still prone to giving perfectly natural occurrences a supernatural explanation. In our ignorance we dismiss perfectly natural phenomena as superstitions. For example, Lake Champlain and Okanagan Lake have hosted populations of fresh water aquatic reptiles for eons.

Lake Champlain

Max. length 201 km (125 mi)
Max. width 23 km (14 mi)
Surface area 1,269 sq km (490 sq mi)
Average depth 19.5 m (64 ft)
Max. depth 122 m (400 ft)

The ones in Lake Champlain are collectively known as Champ.

Lake Okanagan

Max. length  135 kilometres (84 mi)
Max. width 5 kilometres (3.1 mi)
Surface area 351 square kilometres (136 sq mi)
Average depth 76 m (249 ft)
Max. depth 232 m (761 ft)

Those in Lake Okanagan are called Ogopogo.





The jersey of the Kelowna Rockets, of the major junior Western Hockey League, has for decades featured the prehistoric monster dwelling in Lake Okanagan named Ogopogo:



Ogopogo has been devouring careless fishermen and swimmers in the lake for thousands of years.

But Ogopogo is your straight forward garden variety marine reptile. There's nothing supernatural about Ogopogo at all.

 cl:)
« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 10:02:28 AM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #79 on: January 18, 2019, 02:45:17 PM »
Proper vampire demeanour:



Accept NO substitutes!

 thrhrt

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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #80 on: January 23, 2019, 10:15:17 AM »
Careful scholarly research of earth's geological history is very often the key to understanding present day phenomenon.

For example North America has not always had its present shape/form. A large inland sea known as the Western Interior Seaway existed from about 100 million years to 65 million years ago during the mid to late Cretaceous period within what we now call North America. This Western Interior Seaway is therefore also known as the Cretaceous Seaway and the North American Inland Sea. The Western Interior Seaway acted to split the continent of North America into the Laramidia landmass to the west and the Appalachia landmass to the east:





The Western Interior Seaway did of course teem with various fish and reptiles including vicious flesh-eating dinosaurs such as the tylosaurs pictured below:





By the end of the last Ice Age the Western Interior Seaway had shrunk down to Lake Agassiz which covered an area centering on Manitoba approximately 13,000 to 8200 years ago:





The retreat of the Wisconsin ice sheet enabled Lake Agassiz to drain into Hudson Bay leaving remnants such as Lake Winnipeg, Lake Winnipegosis, Lake Manitoba and Lake of the Woods:



A rather sizable vestige population of tylosaurs though continues to survive in Lake Winnipeg and perhaps Cedar Lake as well:





Sightings of Manipogo (as these tylosaurs are now known) are common. Manipogo is in fact much beloved by the people of Manitoba. Local residents are therefore understandably highly protective of their own local "sea monster" despite the occasional hysterical tourist demanding that something be done about the loss of her husband, child, dog, etc. Manipogo too needs to eat of course.


 cl:)
« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 10:19:01 AM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: Professor Hepcat's Primer on Supernatural Beings!
« Reply #81 on: April 10, 2019, 01:26:31 PM »
Contrary to appearances, these two handsome fellows are not direct linear descendants of dinosaurs:

American Alligator



Nile Crocodile



Crocodilians, birds and dinosaurs all evolved from a common ancestor of theirs, archosaurs such as Scythosuchus and Tsylmosuchus, from the early Triassic period which was about 250 million years ago:



Relatively modern crocodilians took shape about 200 million years ago, and unlike their dinosaur cousins they're still around to this very day!

 8)
« Last Edit: April 10, 2019, 01:32:04 PM by Hepcat »
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