Author Topic: Collectiblism  (Read 3912 times)

ProfGriffin

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2008, 08:36:32 AM »
Outstanding posts...and an outstanding topic.

Yes.  Mr. Schow is correct.  There IS something personal...and the ENERGY one gets from these treasures in rubber and plastic is invigorating.  I love to stand in my monster room and just absorb these energy. 
Touching them and holding them, and get a real smile on my face and a glow in my jack o' lantern heart, but just seeing the 'square' glow in the dark box art to an Aurora Frankenstein.

I smell my toys from time to time.
There.  I've said it. 
I LOVE the faint small of a new Mego in the bag, and hold my dear Mad Monsters close so I can inhale deeply.  I smell my AHI Rubber Jiggler Frank...and enjoy his oily petroleum stench.

Now that I think about it.  Most all of my childhood memories can be associated with smells.  There were sights, and music as well, but smells are powerful. 
The Tea Rose perfume of my first real girlfriend, the smell of hot chocolate breath inside a latex mask, the smell of spirit gum and tempera paints...gum from the bottom of collectable monster sticker packs...wax lips, and the smell of old FMs.

Oh, and Frank,  when next you see or talk to David, be sure to thank him for me.  His writing has been an inspiration to me on a lot of levels...and 'Monster Movies' gave me the name of my show.  The Midnight Shadow Show.

Rest in Peace,

Prof. Griffin
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fmofmpls

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2008, 09:01:03 AM »
I smell my AHI Rubber Jiggler Frank...and enjoy his oily petroleum stench.

I couldn't help but to quote this line. There's something terribly wrong about it.

All kidding aside, that was a wonderful reply Griffin. Agreed on all accounts; even the "oily petroleum stench" part.
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poseablemonster

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2008, 02:43:55 PM »
OK...I admit it...I'm a toy smeller, too.   ;D  I guess, in all seriousness, the sense of smell is one of the senses most closely related memory, and for me it is an instant flashback at times.  Not long ago, Ray brought over a bunch of Imagineering stuff; and when he opened the box it was like a time machine for me - because of the smell of that stuff!  It was great.

HARRY HAMMOCK

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2008, 07:17:22 PM »
I have to agree on the smells.I love the smell of my Famous Monsters,Castle of Frankensteins,Monster Times,old Aurora models,the smell of a plant/bush that use to grow along the sidewalk  as we trick or treated(don't know the name of it,but when I smell it now Halloween comes to mind).Certain perfume reminds me of a aunt.Oh well smells do bring back memories.

hhwolfman

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2008, 07:46:54 PM »
Yes the plastic smell on the toys, Like on the GI Joe Headquarters. Ramond is right the Dracula Blood, smell of the tube,  is amazing. The Smell of Jack O Lanterns and the right combination of temperature, on Halloween night. My Grandmothers perfume. I smell it every once in a while , just out of old habit I turn to see if she is there. Certain Smells of a House. I have no Idea What it was, but my Favorite Aunts house, Had a smell,  Id give anything to smell that smell again.  . She passed away a Month ago.  I have boxes of Monster Mags in my room And 250 Thousand Comics at my Store,  So that News print   Smell ,is always about.   :) Yes it is a great that a smell can transfer you back to those Happy Care free Days of your child Hood. HHW

Hepcat

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #20 on: June 24, 2019, 03:41:53 PM »
Not that long ago, I agonized about selling my AHI Creature, and expressed this regret to my dear friend, author David J. Schow. David responded with this rather poignant letter, which put me at ease. In the end, it's about the love you receive from owning the object at the time, and what that love will mean for others when you "pay it forward."

From David:

I once had a long-ago discussion about the "collector's market" versus the
*intrinsic* value of such items, and was reminded that the collector's
market is essentially a totally made-up thing.  It's "imaginary value," if
you will.

I've always detested that AMAZING STORIES episode where Mark Hamill or
somebody is essentially a shunned geek until it turns out his old crap is
worth a lot of dough.  The mood of this triumph is very celebratory --
marginalized guy turns out to have had pretty good taste after all -- but
I got exactly the opposite message from it:  Stuff only has value if it's
worth hard cash.  That may be very American and capitalist and all, but I
thought the sentiment was just rancid.


Alternately, it forces us to keep prized stuff with history in secret
rooms, like art thieves, to only whip it out and gloat over it in private.

I have found a "who cares?" attitude to be quite instructive.  Love can be
leveraged by the unscrupulous (in the literal sense of the word).  This
goes for everything from diamond hierloom jewelry to Pez dispensers, and a
sellout -- if you're selling out your ethics -- is never worth the payoff.

I think you have a very smart attitude, one that I think a lot of "us"
have developed, and one that can be developed solely over a lengthy arc of
time:  Certain possessions held an innate warmth.  Once you've enjoyed
that warmth, the battery is drained and you can let the object go with no
regrets, preferably to someone else for whom it arrives "fully charged"
because of its novelty.  People wonder why fanatic collectors give up
their stuff after a certain period of time, and it is because that stuff
has served its purpose, and can move on.

I also think monster stuff in particular was more precious when there was
a lot less of it.

Famous Monsters wasn't subject to deconstructionist scrutiny when it was
the only mag in town.

I only have a few select issues of FM, but most have been with me since I
first bought them.  Oddly, I enjoy smelling them more than reading them.


David, in his own inimibitable fashion, makes a wonderful point here. The treasure is transferable. One persons leftovers can be another persons appetizers. In respect to the passing of Linda Miller, all that she acquired will move on, by intent or by accident, to some new person, who hopefully will find new joy in its history.

The part I really like is the paragraph I've highlighted in red.

 8)
Collecting! It's what I do!

Monsters For Sale

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2019, 08:34:26 AM »

I found this paragraph interesting:

I think you have a very smart attitude, one that I think a lot of "us"
have developed, and one that can be developed solely(slowly?) over a lengthy arc of
time:  Certain possessions held an innate warmth.  Once you've enjoyed
that warmth, the battery is drained and you can let the object go with no
regrets, preferably to someone else for whom it arrives "fully charged"
because of its novelty.  People wonder why fanatic collectors give up
their stuff after a certain period of time, and it is because that stuff
has served its purpose, and can move on.


Explains how a car enthusiast can spend 3 years and a lot of money restoring a vintage classic - only to sell it once it is perfect and buy another junker.


ADAM

Hepcat

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2019, 10:26:57 AM »
With me it's quite simple. Acquiring what I either owned or coveted as a kid fills me with delight! Moreover viewing the items in my collection is a pleasure and just knowing I have them in my possession leaves me with a sense of quite satisfaction. NOT having these items in my possession would also now leave me with an incredible sense of both loss and actual failure.

Admittedly there's probably an element of compulsion in my character involving my desire to add to my collectibles. BUT, I lack the compulsions for tobacco, alcohol, drugs and over-eating that most other adults possess, and my compulsion to acquire things neither kills brain cells nor acts to shorten my life. And I'd much rather devote the time, money and effort that I might expend "treating" my compulsion to simply adding to my collectibles.

And screw what anybody else thinks! Everybody else can go to hell.

 C:)
Collecting! It's what I do!

Hepcat

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2020, 02:57:03 PM »
I found this paragraph interesting:

I think you have a very smart attitude, one that I think a lot of "us"
have developed, and one that can be developed solely(slowly?) over a lengthy arc of
time:  Certain possessions held an innate warmth.  Once you've enjoyed
that warmth, the battery is drained and you can let the object go with no
regrets, preferably to someone else for whom it arrives "fully charged"
because of its novelty.  People wonder why fanatic collectors give up
their stuff after a certain period of time, and it is because that stuff
has served its purpose, and can move on.


Explains how a car enthusiast can spend 3 years and a lot of money restoring a vintage classic - only to sell it once it is perfect and buy another junker.

Well sort of. I still find it difficult to understand/grasp the mentality of such people though. It's not like mine.

 :-\
« Last Edit: May 06, 2020, 09:59:45 PM by Hepcat »
Collecting! It's what I do!

horrorhunter

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2020, 06:12:10 PM »
I once had a long-ago discussion about the "collector's market" versus the
*intrinsic* value of such items, and was reminded that the collector's
market is essentially a totally made-up thing.  It's "imaginary value," if
you will.
Some people like to sound profound when they speak about collectibles having "imaginary" value, but in reality perception is everything when it comes to assigning a fair market value for collectibles. Sellers check price guides and Sold eBay listings and other sources as well as drawing on memories of what was popular in the past and factoring in inflation and other variables to arrive at a price they think they can get for a given item. Try telling a dealer with a FN (6.0) copy of Vampirella #1 that his $400 price tag is just "imaginary" and he ought to sell it to you for buck.  ::)
ALWAYS MONSTERING...

John Pertwee

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #25 on: May 09, 2020, 07:26:43 PM »
What a fantastic thread.
I have been thinking about my collection this year. I just turned 51 and my shuffling off this mortal coil has been on my mind. I  have been collecting since I was a kid, and when I started making money it mushroomed. Once I started buying and selling toys and comics I was able to trade up and get even more stuff. With my current income, I can moderately spend between one and two thousand a year on  my collecting but I feel like I am reaching a saturation point. I have begun focusing on gaps in my collection and the must have items I can find cheap. I went from mainly comics, to mainly toys, and now mostly books.

I recently realized that my collection is worth quite a bit, and that it is only worth this because I know what I have and how to maximize sales. My kids will not be able to do this, and that scares me to death. My current plan is to make a list of the "Heavy Hitters" in the collection and basically give them an idea of how to proceed.

Therin of Andor

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2020, 04:03:46 AM »
What I am coming to realise:

Many of my inherited treasures from my grandparents and parents, and the toys from my early childhood, come with very personal, oft-told anecdotes. I happen to have a good memory for stories, but my two brothers and their families live interstate and I have no kids, so even when/if they inherit my stuff, they won't know any of the stories, and will probably have no yearning to own the things for themselves. Furthermore, my brothers don't seem to have very accurate memories for the details of our cumulative, shared childhood memories.

No one will want my stuff...

I don't think I could bear to sell everything.
Thiptho lapth,

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marsattacks666

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2020, 06:23:29 PM »
Collecting has become a curse.
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BigShadow

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Re: Collectiblism
« Reply #28 on: June 21, 2020, 10:39:32 PM »
Iím turning 40 and surprisingly main thing on my mind is my collection.  Iíve been selling some things over the years that I no longer want, but have been keeping about 98% of everything.  Being that I have two young nieces, I hope that when Iím in my 60ís or 70ís I can pass a bulk of the collection off to one or both of them.  They are 4 and 3 now (I think, lol), but I plan to plant the classic monster seed when they reach 7 or 8.  Maybe it will take on one of them.

Another big issue with my collection is space.  Iíve sold some lesser desirable items to make room for better one.  Pretty much robbing Peter to pay Paul.  Itís been working fine so far, but as the years go by I find that space has become the main issue, which I sure it is for most.

Itís a never ending battle...but itís fun...and nerve racking.


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