Frankenstein's Monster make up

Started by snake21104, September 17, 2009, 05:06:58 PM

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JuliaAdamsIsSoHot

Quote from: Wicked Lester on September 20, 2009, 12:44:01 PM
I'm sure this has been asked before. Who decided that Frankenstein's monster would be green and why? Dead bodies usually turn blueish. BTW , I like Strange as Frankie best as far as looks.

When Frankenstein first played in theaters, some of the movie houses inserted a green filter over the projector lens. Ever since then, the monster has been thought of as green. Even though everyone in the fim was green!

josezombiekillr

Quote from: Wicked Lester on September 20, 2009, 12:44:01 PM
I'm sure this has been asked before. Who decided that Frankenstein's monster would be green and why? Dead bodies usually turn blueish. BTW , I like Strange as Frankie best as far as looks.

Green grease paint was used because when it was filmed on a specific type of black and white film it would photograph as dead white. ( red had to be added to the makeup of actors in the same scenes as the monster ). It got out that he was painted green and so everyone thought that was supposed to be his intended color. Even though it wasn't.

A few years later there was some color test footage of Boris in makeup. Son of Frankenstein was originally going to be shot in technicolor (thank goodness it wasn't).
Just remember. There are such things.

Rich

I have seen a picture and moving footage of Boris Karloff in color from Son of Frankenstein. Personally I think it is pretty cool. I am not against coloring the films, like some others are, so long as the glorious black and white versions are still offered. I have the up most respect for the artistic value in these films. I love their black and white aspect because as a student of photography, I look at them as black and white photographs. They are full of rich imagery. On the other hand I always though it would be cool if they made a DVD or now Blu-Ray massive box set with every single film from all six monster legacy collections where they were black and white and color. I have a few of the action figures released five or six years ago in both black and white and color. I love how they look.
Listen to them. Children of the Night. What music they make!

karloff

isn't it ironic that Lugosi who turned down the part of the Monster at the height of his career, which then opened the door for Karloff, would agree to play him during the twilight of his career when the part that he deemed to be all make up and no acting was the one that paired him with Chaney jr. and created one of the most memorable clashes in universal history.

Mitchellmania

My son ( eight at the time) and I watched Frank vs the Wolfman, and my son said "Frankenstein looked too feeble".

Stars1100

Quote from: Mike Scott on September 17, 2009, 05:53:37 PM
It's mostly the actors. Chaney and Lugosi have round faces that don't work with the Frankenstein make-up design (as it was designed for Karloff's face). Strange's facial structure was much closer to Karloff's. Chaney and Lugosi looked a little too healthy (i.e. fat) to have been made from corpses.

Also Karloff took out one of his molers which pushed in his cheek in and it made him much more Gaunt looking.

Stars1100

Stars1100

#21
Here's something I think you all might like from Youtube, its about 9 minutes and you are shown how the Monster's(AKA) Frankensten's Make-Up is Done, interesting video.

Kevin Haney created this Glenn Strange Frankenstein Monster prosthetic likeness makeup in 1999 for the original Jack Pierce tribute which was never staged. As such, this makeup was only applied one time, with assistance by Kenny Myers and Bill Corso. Eventually, Haney created a Boris Karloff Monster makeup that was used several times for tributes to Pierce and Frankenstein (1931).

SPECIAL MAKEUP EFFECTS FRANKENSTEIN MONSTER

Stars1100


fmofmpls

Cool video!

BTW, when sharing a YouTube video at UMA, all you need to do is paste the url of the video directly into your post. No need for any embed code. I edited your post so the video would show correctly.  ;)
The Famous Monster of Mpls.  Sayer of the law.

lblambert

Quote from: josezombiekillr on April 21, 2010, 06:36:38 PM
Green grease paint was used because when it was filmed on a specific type of black and white film it would photograph as dead white.

I had a conversation with Sara Karloff about the color of the makeup and this exactly what she had told me. She also mentioned that in the later films with Glenn Strange and her dad's appearance in the Route 66 episode, the film technology had changed so to get the same look the makeup was done in silver.


josezombiekillr

Quote from: lblambert on July 29, 2010, 01:36:06 AM
Sara Karloff  also mentioned that in the later films with Glenn Strange and her dad's appearance in the Route 66 episode, the film technology had changed so to get the same look the makeup was done in silver.

That bit I did not know. That is really cool. Thanks.
Just remember. There are such things.

fibbermac

For those wondering just how green Karloff was in his monster make-up, I lifted my avatar from the color footage of Karloff as the monster.

-fibbermac-
"Even a man who's pure in heart and says his prayers by night..."

Gillman-Fan

Video Watchdog Magazine issue #142 has color photos of the monster makeups from that episode of Route 66.

Illoman

Quote from: Gillman-Fan on July 31, 2010, 02:09:18 PM
Video Watchdog Magazine issue #142 has color photos of the monster makeups from that episode of Route 66.

Can anyone scan and share?

Mike

BlackLagoon

Karloff to me, is just the face of Frankenstein...though I cannot stress enough I love Strange as the monster as well.

It seems to me Karloff's monster is somewhat clumsy, weak..."new in his body" curious but affraid..etc.

Strange as the monster is much more "comic book Frankenstein". When I think of the monster Glenn Strange becomes, it's the rampaging, stronger than human--"bust through walls" kinda Frank. Which is awesome too--I just find it to be 2 different versions of the monster...or perhaps just a progression of Frankenstein.
"I send my murdergram to all the monster kids, it comes right back to me, signed in their parents blood"

Sean

The Karloff version is classic and alone in it's own 'style'.

The Strange Frank is appealing because it was such a hulking, brutish being that punched through doors and threw people through windows, etc.