The Future of Physical Media

Started by Monsters For Sale, July 14, 2020, 06:58:55 AM

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BigShadow

With Cancel Culture rearing its ugly head around every corner, it would appear that owning physical media is more important now more than ever.
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marsattacks666

Quote from: BigShadow on March 15, 2021, 01:00:43 AM
With Cancel Culture rearing its ugly head around every corner, it would appear that owning physical media is more important now more than ever.

As long as I am alive, collecting Physical media is my standard. Cannot imagine a life without VHS, laserdisc, DVD, bluray, Vvnyl records or cds in my collection.
    "They come from the bowels of hell; a transformed race of walking dead. Zombies, guided by a master plan for complete domination of the Earth."

Mike Scott

Quote from: marsattacks666 on March 15, 2021, 03:19:00 AM
Cannot imagine a life without VHS, laserdisc, DVD, bluray, Vinyl records or cds in my collection.

You forgot Cassettes and 8-Tracks.  ;D
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Monsters For Sale

Quote from: Mike Scott on March 15, 2021, 05:39:11 AM
You forgot Cassettes and 8-Tracks.  ;D 

I remember getting a mini portable reel-to-reel tape recorder.  Must have been about 1964.
ADAM

Doh!

Last month, a storm knocked out my internet for about a week! I was so grateful to have a large supply of DVDs and Blu-rays on hand.

Mike Scott

Quote from: Monsters For Sale on March 15, 2021, 05:45:59 AM
I remember getting a mini portable reel-to-reel tape recorder.

I had one of those, for a while. (I think it self-destructed?)
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Hepcat

Quote from: Monsters For Sale on March 15, 2021, 05:45:59 AMI remember getting a mini portable reel-to-reel tape recorder.  Must have been about 1964.

Mini portable reel-to-reel? Isn't that the definition of a cassette deck? Tape width 0.15 inches and speed 1 7/8 inches per second (compared to 8-track cartridges which had a tape width of 0.25 inches and a speed of 3 3/4 inches per second).

???
Collecting! It's what I do!

Monsters For Sale

Quote from: Hepcat on March 17, 2021, 05:09:26 PM
Mini portable reel-to-reel? Isn't that the definition of a cassette deck? Tape width 0.15 inches and speed 1 7/8 inches per second (compared to 8-track cartridges which had a tape width of 0.25 inches and a speed of 3 3/4 inches per second).

???

No.   It was an open reel-to-reel.  Two little separate reels.  The tape player had 2 speeds.

Pre-dated cassettes.
ADAM

Mike Scott

Quote from: Hepcat on March 17, 2021, 05:09:26 PM
Mini portable reel-to-reel? Isn't that the definition of a cassette deck?

It's the definition of this.

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Hepcat

Quote from: BigShadow on March 15, 2021, 01:00:43 AMWith Cancel Culture rearing its ugly head around every corner, it would appear that owning physical media is more important now more than ever.

I understand that "ownership" of anything up in the cloud is a very nebulous concept as opposed to being cast in stone. This doesn't just apply to movies which can be censored by Big Brother or whoever in the name of political correctness. It also extends to music. The original version of a song that you thought you "bought" can at the whim of the streaming service be replaced by a version with less "offensive" lyrics or the newest remasturbated one (even if the reworked one is clipped and much inferior).

There is of course also the issue of what happens to one's movie or music collection if the streaming service goes belly up due to technological change. (Remember Blockbuster Video?) Then of course who's to say that the whole internet will continue to function if the developed world all goes the way of Venezuela? Everything including whatever movies, music and cryptocurrencies people keep in the form of electronic impulses will all go to hell in a handbasket then.

Had you asked me just over a year ago, I would have been confident that the "authorities" would still be able to hold things together for a few more decades and that bags of silver and/or gold coinage salted away in one's sub-basement would end up as someone else's archaeological windfall. I'm no longer so sure.

I'll just keep my vinyl, cassettes and CDs, thank you very much. The coins would be nice, but I can't shake the feeling that they're way overpriced (compared to say butter and eggs).

:-\
Collecting! It's what I do!

Hepcat

Quote from: Monsters For Sale on March 17, 2021, 05:43:45 PMNo.   It was an open reel-to-reel.  Two little separate reels.  The tape player had 2 speeds.

Pre-dated cassettes.

Here's an interesting article on the timeline of various audio formats:

Timeline of Audio Formats - Wikipedia

Interesting that Philips developed the compact cassette format strictly for business recording applications. It wasn't intended for music. That's why the tape was so thin (a negative) and slow (another negative). But because it was so compact, cassettes became ever more popular as a medium for music. While the wider and faster moving tape of 8-track cartridges provided superior music reproduction initially, the endless loop technology 8-tracks employed was clunky and subject to breaking down as well as bulky. When better quality tape and the Dolby noise reduction feature were develooped for cassettes in the early 1970's, they then very quickly overtook 8-tracks in the marketplace. In 1974, when I bought my cassette deck for my Dodge Charger plus another one for my home stereo, 8-tracks still dominated the market. By 1979 the tables had been turned completely and 8-track was a dying format.

The ideal would of course have been cassettes with a tape width of 0.25 inches and a speed of 3 3/4 inches per second. They might have been about 50% bigger in size than the cassettes Philips developed but they would still have been only about half the size of 8-track cartridges.

:-\
Collecting! It's what I do!

LugosiFan25

The thing I find crazy about streaming in general is that everyone assumes that every movie that has ever been made is available for streaming online. They have no idea the countless amount of films that have never been made available on home video, let alone streaming online. 

Let's also consider how fickle these streaming services are with their classic film and television content.  Amazon Prime still seems to be the best bet out there, but their selections change constantly.  One day a film is on Prime and the next you have to pay $15 for air just to view the movie. 

And I remember 8-10 years ago when Netflix first launched their streaming service.  They had tons of classic films on their service. Then they decided to purge almost everything. 

Streaming is convenient, but I can't help feeling the general public is selling it's soul to the devil for the sake of convenience AHEM laziness AHEM.   

I'll stick with my Blus, DVDs, and VHS tapes, thank you very much. 
"....flying saucers? You mean the kind from up there?"

Doh!

I'm a huge fan of convenience so really like streaming, but  another advantage of physical media is if they change it for the "better," the original versions are yours to keep. Here's an interesting article on the TV series Buffy the Vampire being remastered. I'm am SO glad I have the older DVDs:

https://www.themarysue.com/remastered-buffy-is-a-butt/

And don't get me started on what Lucas did to the original Star Wars movies. Again, I'm lucky enough to have the OT on DVD with the original (albeit low res) cuts as "extras." At this point, we won't be getting them on BR until Georgie kicks the bucket. I don't wish the man dead, but...

Mike Scott

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Doh!

Original Trilogy.

Not to be confused with the PT or the ST...

(Prequel and Sequel)