For babyboomers, did your town have a local kids' show host?

Started by ChristineBCW, February 21, 2016, 01:50:06 PM

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Hepcat

Quote from: ChristineBCW on February 21, 2016, 01:50:06 PMI keep hearing "yes yes yes" but that's only from maybe a dozen cities.  I'm wondering if this was a nation-wide activity?  They used local talent in local studios.  They might have had nationally syndicated shows like CAPTAIN KANGAROO and COWBOY BOB, maybe BOZO, too. 

So far, I'm finding "yes" if the town was 100,000 or more and had a local TV station, or two or more within a broadcast radius of, say, 50 miles.  I'm not sure about radius-distance, nor certain about population.  East Coast will be far different than west-of-Mississippi, I've discovered.

So what do your survey results tentatively indicate at this point?

???
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Dr. Jitters

Our local kids' show was The Captain Jinks Show, with Salty Sam (out of Peoria, IL).  Here's my page on it:  http://www.houseofjitters.com/jinks.htm

A good overview on the subject is this book, though not without some factual errors:
http://www.amazon.com/There-Girls-Americas-Childrens-Programs/dp/1578063957/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Good times, good memories!

Hepcat

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Anthony Caranci

I'm 62 years old, and I can still remember living in Glendora, California and watching "Jeepers Creepers Theater" in 1962 with Horror Host Bob Guy as Jeeper. If I remember correctly, in 1963, the show changed its title to "Theater 13" and had a Horror Hostess named Ghoulita; played by Lietta Harvey (1963 to 1964), the show, broadcast on Saturday nights at 10:00 p.m. on KCOP Channel 13 Los Angeles, California until 1965.

I also remember watching Monster movies on Friday nights as well, as it became "a two night event" every week, but I don't remember if they were part of the same show or not. 

I remember there were Universal Monsters (and Monsters in general), everywhere. I also remember Shrimpenstein, Captain Kangaroo, Sherriff John, Engineer Bill and Soupy Sales. Most of all, for me, it was all about Monsters! Even now, all those years later - it's still Monsters!

I lifted parts of this post from an Introduction I penned for a book I have written of all eight Frankenstein Films. The book is a scene by scene analysis of all eight films, including all spoken dialogue. However, after completion; the book did not seem like a marketable product, except as a possible study guide. So while it sits on the shelf -- it did serve a purpose in giving an old Monster fan something to do in retirement.

Haunted hearse

Quote from: Mord on February 21, 2016, 05:31:50 PM
In L.A., we had this little puppet host named "Shrimpenstein". He has patterned after the "Son of Frankenstein" monster (animal fur & all). I don't remember that much about the shows' content, but I'm pretty sure he introduced short, cheesy cartoons (like those early Marvel Comics ones).
They also had bat puppets singing sped up songs called "The Tiajuana Bats".  Gene Moss as Dr. Von Schtick would often have no problem ridiculing the shows sponsor.  Once looking at a package of "Moo Juice" he commented the the bovine on the package looked like a cow with it's brains kicked in.
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LundyAfterMidnight



Not a kids' show, but my local creature feature from back in the day, couldn't resist the opportunity to share!
"Well friends, that's all there is to life: just a little laugh, a little tear." - Prof. Echo (Lon Chaney, Sr.)

LundyAfterMidnight

#51


Mr. Peppermint from the Dallas-Ft. Worth area, mid 1960's, a nearly forgotten blast from my past. He was a friend of a friend of my father's, & I got to meet him once at their home. I remember he was a very kind person.
"Well friends, that's all there is to life: just a little laugh, a little tear." - Prof. Echo (Lon Chaney, Sr.)

charp13

I grew up in the tiny town of Addison, MI.  In the 60s/70s I too, remember the awesome Sir Graves Ghastley!!   He would have his sdekicks like the Glob, and show the best movies in the world!  Sitting on the floor, drinking chocolate milk, and watching The Wolfman, The Mummy, Frankenstein & my favorite-   Creature from the Black Lagoon!  Without Sir Graves- I don't know how I would have made it through the monotony of living in a township of 300 people.  Hahahaha!  I remember out station came from Lansing/Jackon and Flint.  But I don't remember the actual network.   

Mike Scott

Should have been done a long time ago, but this topic really belongs in TELEVISION.
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Hepcat

Have local kids' show hosts disappeared from television these days or are they still common?

???
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Mike Scott

Quote from: Hepcat on November 18, 2016, 04:11:00 PM
Have local kids' show hosts disappeared from television these days or are they still common?

I can't think of any. Or even national hosts, similar to Capt. Kangaroo, or Bozo. Even the horror movie hosts are meant to appeal to people like us, instead of kids.
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Dr.Cyclops

We didn't have our own in Toronto in the 60's/70's but we didn't need one either because we picked up that "Great cosmopolitan City"  :D  : Buffalo!!! and their amazing Morning show:Rocketship 7 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketship_7
.After school and on weekends we had their equally good Commander Tom show https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commander_Tom_Show

Little tidbit: Dave Thomas the host of Rocketship 7 is the Father of David Boreanaz, Angel on Buffy the Vampire Slayer and more recently of "Bones".

"A Castle without a Crypt is like a Unicorn without a Horn" ~ Professor Abronsius

Hepcat

Quote from: Dr.Cyclops on November 19, 2016, 04:15:37 AMWe didn't have our own in Toronto in the 60's/70's but we didn't need one either because we picked up that "Great cosmopolitan City"  :D  : Buffalo!!!

Yes, in those days Buffalo being a big American city represented vibrant modern sophistication to the burghers to the burghers of sleepy Toronto-the-good where nothing much ever happened.

;)
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ChristineBCW

Thanks for noting and moving this to the Television section.  Obviously, I poorly considered the Sat-Afternoon Film Content originally but that quickly modified into the Local Host concept - which is only a TV feature.

Hep, the question back in April about what I'd learned.  I'm still compiling.  I am rather surprised that the Local Show Host concept lasted into 1990.  I suspect the creation of so many "cartoon channels" was the effective stake-in-the-heart because that might have removed local stations from bidding on syndicated shows. 

I'm not sure how that worked in the '50s, '60s and into the '70s.  From what I've read so far, the 1970s was the beginning of the end.  Most cities closed off these Local Host shows in the early '80s, or by the mid-70s.

I suspect there's a much larger force - new ownership groups that would sweep up local channels into conglomeration.  Local channels were nothing more than a branch-facility - not "local" at all.  NYC, LA, maybe Chicago, maybe Philly or Boston were able to be HQs or home-stations for their conglomeration - maybe these virtually syndicated those local hosts.

Atlanta's WTBS - owned by Ted Turner - had a syndicated local host Bill Tush that did voice-overs, intro's to movies, ever as a talking-head newscaster.  He retired in 2003 but his WTBS era was over before 1990, it appears. 

It appears that the Conglomerate Ownership and the Syndication Package Movement ("you must show 400 of our shows, not 3") were the causes of death for these truly local stations.

Hepcat

Quote from: ChristineBCW on December 24, 2016, 08:36:51 PMI suspect there's a much larger force - new ownership groups that would sweep up local channels into conglomeration.  Local channels were nothing more than a branch-facility - not "local" at all.  NYC, LA, maybe Chicago, maybe Philly or Boston were able to be HQs or home-stations for their conglomeration - maybe these virtually syndicated those local hosts.

It appears that the Conglomerate Ownership and the Syndication Package Movement ("you must show 400 of our shows, not 3") were the causes of death for these truly local stations.

Once upon a time local shows could act as a stepping stone for national syndication. Shari Lewis and her puppet friends got their start on WRCA of New York in 1953.





:)
Collecting! It's what I do!