Cosmos 2.0

Started by Fester, March 10, 2014, 05:47:58 AM

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Fester

Just finished watching Cosmos: A Commercial Laden Odyssey. What content survived massive commercial interruptions was pretty good, albeit highly derivative of the original series. But that was to be expected. The images were wonderful, except for the animated comic book-er-"graphic novel" story of Giordano Bruno. This series had great potential, however, it lost much of its impact by losing Sagan's contemplative mood. Sadly that was caused by the one thing Sagan never had to contend with on PBS: incessant, jarring commercials.

I won't be bothering with the rest of the series on Fox. Maybe someday, it will be released on dvd/bluray without ads to spoil the continuity.

Dr Tyson, Ms Druyan, Mr MacFarlane: Nice try. Too bad you sold out.

McDougals House of Horror

I agree with you Fester -- the commercials did seem endless which is why I rarely watch non-cable channels (have no choice with Bates Motel so I watch it on OnDemand after it first airs and FF through the ads). But what I found most amusing about this program was how insignificant one little planet like the Earth is in the universe over a span of billions and billions and billions of years, yet greenies are trying to convince us that in a span of a few decades a few reallyinsignificant humans are close to destroying the earth. C'mon Al....
"Do you know what I've got in those crates?"

eviljim

had allot of friends raving on this , i dvr'd  to watch later after the hockey game. being a big fan of the old series , i thought it felt flat.
commercials aside , i didnt like the editing or the music. but will give a few more episodes a try.
Everybody needs to believe in something , I believe I'll have another beer!

zombiehorror

How does the commercial slots that Fox sells equate to McFarlane, Druyan and Dr. Tyson selling out?  They'd have nothing to do with that, none of them own Fox Broadcasting.  Fox was just an easy greenlightvsince McFarlane has a long working relationship with them!

Count_Zirock

Quote from: McDougals House of Horror on March 10, 2014, 09:19:40 PM
But what I found most amusing about this program was how insignificant one little planet like the Earth is in the universe over a span of billions and billions and billions of years, yet greenies are trying to convince us that in a span of a few decades a few really insignificant humans are close to destroying the earth. C'mon Al....
Not destroying it, no. Making it a more hostile environment for us to survive in? Most definitely. The industrial revolution didn't start "a few decades" ago. It's been ongoing for nearly 200 years. The amount of pollution we've poured into our atmosphere and water systems is undeniable. We are having an effect on ecological systems worldwide; some of these systems were fragile enough to begin with. Yes, in relation to the rest of the universe, we are pretty insignificant. But, this is the only planet we human beings have to inhabit. To deny our impact on it is to doom our species. In the long run, maybe that isn't such a bad thing. Earth will become too dirty for us to inhabit it, and we'll die off. In time, our impact will fade and the planet can reset itself. Great series on that was "Life Without People."

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"That's either a very ugly woman or a very pretty monster." - Lou Costello

Fester

Quote from: zombiehorror on March 11, 2014, 01:02:49 AM
How does the commercial slots that Fox sells equate to McFarlane, Druyan and Dr. Tyson selling out?  They'd have nothing to do with that, none of them own Fox Broadcasting.  Fox was just an easy greenlightvsince McFarlane has a long working relationship with them!

Last night, when I started this thread, I must confess, I was pretty pissed off. The new Cosmos was being touted as a reboot/update of Carl Sagan's seminal series.  What I saw was lots of flashy images, a few lines cribbed from the original series, gross oversimplifications and lots of commercials.  Maybe selling out was not the term I was reaching for.  Perhaps Buying In?  The original Cosmos was calm and contemplative, much as Sagan himself seemed to be, judging from his writings.

This iteration seems to have the attention span of a squirrel on caffeine.
Sagan's original Cosmos ran 13 hour-long episodes, narration smoothly flowing from one subject to the next. 
This version is going to be thirteen 35-to-40 minute episodes interrupted by commercial breaks every seven or eight minutes. The rest of the hour is commercial filler.
Therefore, there is less content.

Also, the program has been oversimplified to the point of spreading actual falsehoods.
Case in point: the Giordano Bruno animation.  True, Bruno was burned for heresy. However, his unorthodox cosmological guessing (a blend of his mysticism and astrology--not astronomy) were not part of the charges.

He was charged with: holding opinions contrary to the Catholic faith and speaking against it and its ministers.
Denying the Trinity, divinity of Christ, and Incarnation.
Teaching that Jesus was not the Christ.
Denying doctrine regarding the virginity of Mary.
Arguing against the doctrines of Transubstantiation and the nature of the Mass;
Believing in reincarnation and in the transmigration of the human soul into animals.
Dealing in magics and divination.
The sequence of his visit to England was laughably bad. Why was a man known to be average height presented being dwarfed behind the podium?  And he lived there two years writing books on magic and divination.

Bruno, the martyr of science was a myth created in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The move to commercial television was a decision made by Tyson, McFarlane and Druyan ostensibly to gain a wider audience. And I suspect, they all gave themselves plenty of monetary compensation--which is to be expected.   Supposedly, Fox Entertainment gave them free rein to produce the series as they saw fit. However, content was limited--and I suspect oversimplified in favor of exciting images crammed in between commercials.



Wich2

>how insignificant one little planet like the Earth is in the universe over a span of billions and billions and billions of years, yet greenies are trying to convince us that in a span of a few decades a few reallyinsignificant humans are close to destroying the earth<

The two things are obviously not in conflict.

Yes, the Earth has been around for a VERY long time - but Mankind has only been pumping literally tons of complex hydrocarbons, and myriad other manmade poisons, into this closed system for about 200 years.

Of COURSE that would have a negative effect on lifeforms in the loop.

Fester

There have been 5 major and numerous "minor" extinction events on this planet. In total well over 90% of all species that have ever lived on Earth are now extinct.

And if Humans are the cause of extinction event number 6?

Well, the Earth abides.

Count_Zirock

I'm just sorry to hear that the new "Cosmos" seems to be more flash than substance. If they're dumbing things down, or even presenting historical aspects incorrectly, then that's not "Cosmos."

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"That's either a very ugly woman or a very pretty monster." - Lou Costello

Wich2

>And if Humans are the cause of extinction event number 6?

Well, the Earth abides.<

Fester-

1. In what way is that comforting? A planet has no soul.

2. It would be sad, because of the tragic ignorance it would prove.

-Craig

Fester

I never said it was comforting. 
The Earth is neither good nor bad. It is indifferent

The Earth has been around a heck of a lot longer than have humans. 
And it will be around well after humanity has become extinct.
Humanity extinct by its own doing? 
I agree that would be sad--even tragic.

Humanity extinct by natural causes? Meteorite? Gamma-Ray Burst? Super Volcano?  Pandemic? That's par for the course, Charlie!

There is no guarantee that humanity will be somehow exempt from extinction.

People like to think of a failure or something obsolete as a "dinosaur."
Well, those "failures" were the dominant life forms for a hundred and fifty million years.

Humans? 
Not even close. Homo Sapiens (our species--mostly) have been around only 250,000 years or so.
We have only been writing down stuff for six or seven thousand years.

Do I find the probability of human extinction depressing?
No.

It is not the quantity of our existence on Earth that matters. 
What matters is what we do on Earth while we are here.

Ozymandias

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

Percy Bysshe Shelley

zombiehorror

Quote from: Fester on March 11, 2014, 02:38:13 AM

Also, the program has been oversimplified to the point of spreading actual falsehoods.
Case in point: the Giordano Bruno animation.  True, Bruno was burned for heresy. However, his unorthodox cosmological guessing (a blend of his mysticism and astrology--not astronomy) were not part of the charges.

He was charged with: holding opinions contrary to the Catholic faith and speaking against it and its ministers.
Denying the Trinity, divinity of Christ, and Incarnation.
Teaching that Jesus was not the Christ.
Denying doctrine regarding the virginity of Mary.
Arguing against the doctrines of Transubstantiation and the nature of the Mass;
Believing in reincarnation and in the transmigration of the human soul into animals.
Dealing in magics and divination.

Sounds like a bunch of bs charges to get rid of free thinking; he wasn't the only one being hasseled by the
Catholic church/the Inquisition.  Philosophers, scientists, doctors (and God forbid you owned something that someone with high standing with the Church wanted from you) were questioned and tortured, libraries were confiscated/destroyed; the only way to survive was to accept God (whether you believed or not) and to sometimes denounce your heresy or more to the point, your thoughts that the Catholic Church deemed were heresy.

I'm not so sure that it matters what any of the charges were in any of these "trials", the motives of the Church had nothing to do with religion (that was just a cover all) and everything to do with greed, envy, fear and paranoia.  Much like the Salem witch trials; the charges range the gamut of witchery but none of them point to the truth.

BaronLatos35

I liked the first episode. Yes commercials blow, that is TV.

I remember seeing the original as a kid. I loved it and Sagan was interstellar cool to me.

I like Tyson a lot, I like his style. I love that they are trying to bring a curiosity for science to the forefront. If kids today watch some of this, that is a good thing. It is much better than playing Grand Theft Auto for the 1000th time or watching reality show #2378.

I am looking forward to seeing the whole series.
"For one who has lived but a single lifetime, you are a wise man ...Van Helsing."
"I shall awaken memories of love and crime and death..."

Monsters For Sale


I was underwhelmed.  The first episode was a deliberately simplified general introduction to the series.

I will give it a couple more episodes.  I hope the next chapters benefit from being more specific and detailed explorations of narrower subject matter.

Are they going to continue airing repeats of the Sagan original series before each new remake?  I hope so.
ADAM

Fester

I've had about a week to cool off.
Still not happy about the 42 minutes of program and 18-20 minutes of commercials, but hey, someone has to pay for the show.
I guess I'll check out a couple more episodes and hope for the best.
Nothing else on Spokanistan TeeVee at that time anyway . . .