Author Topic: Opinions are like SKULLs ...  (Read 355 times)

Sir Masksalot

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Opinions are like SKULLs ...
« on: May 09, 2020, 12:24:45 AM »
I paraphrase of course but you know the punchline: " ... everybody has one." Later I want to see yours
because Randotti fan marsattacks666 has inspired me to start an all-inclusive thread on the topic of prop skulls.



Genuine human skulls were once a common fixture in the libraries of doctors and classical scholars. During the
late twentieth century, the price of skulls and skeletons increased so much that replicas became more practical
for use in medical schools and the like. The skull as pop culture icon has evolved into a stylized deathshead,
often infused with an aspect of emotion.



Some folks say they all look alike but I totally disagree. The artists who sculpt them impart in each its own
distinct personality; some placid, some sinister. My own collection aptly represents both categories.

There actually exists an image of the first prop skull I ever owned. It was close to life-sized, hollow rubber
with movable jaw and available at most novelty shops of the 1960s. Does anyone recognize this style?
'Sorry about the rubber rat in its mouth. Such was the mindset of a pre-teen monster boy >



My second prop skull was an original clay sculpture, gifted me by a family member in the late 1960s >



After this, prop skulls came on fast and furious. This one was from a Halloween superstore, made of
rigid lightweight foam by GAG Studios >



At left is the standard prop skull catalogued by Morris Costumes. It got sent out to a painter for
"antiquing" and returned Giger-ized.  :o  I can't recall where the skull at right came from, probably
a convention. It looks like a plaster recast of the old Revell model skull, doesn't it?



The full "scientific" name of this next one is Daemon Rumphapithecus which came complete with
fact sheet explaining the occult scrimshaw along its sides. We can't know when it was first made
as there are two dates sculpted into the bottom >



This is currently my favorite stone skull, marked "Arteology 1990". It's also got a nice display base sculpted in >

       

This one was a gift from somebody. The dagger pulls out to reveal a coin slot. The only marking on it is "A.C.K. Company, Los Angeles" >



For a time this was my favorite rubber skull because it resembled the jungle decor at Disneyland.
One day, I stuffed it full of polyfluff and forgot about it on a high shelf. Over time it bloated, crisped,
and cracked beyond repair. 'No idea who produced it originally. Otherwise I'd try to replace it >



My latest skull score is this creepy little number from The Skull Shoppe ... plus, it glows in the dark!




That's all my best. Now it's your turn. Reply with pics of your own prop skulls ... and make sure
at least one is plainly visible on your bookshelf when I stop by for inspection.


BRICK

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Re: Opinions are like SKULLs ...
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2020, 10:06:34 PM »
Here is a skull I created inspired by Pirates of the Carribean.

When times are dark, donít consider art to be merely a distraction; rather, think of it as a lifeline-  Neil Gaiman paraphrase.

skully

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Re: Opinions are like SKULLs ...
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2020, 02:23:45 PM »
Skulls are cool.  I have many scattered throughout my house probably in every room,  old and new, many sizes.  I have a life size skeleton hanging in my living room on the side of my tall bookcase which is absolutely stuffed with monster stuff.  Did anyone else see the actual prop skull listed on E-bay for a while now of the skull held by Frankenstein in the crypt from the movie Bride of Frankenstein?      Don't know if I ever told this story before,  one of my favorite skull pieces is a large piece of art, done by John Febonio, years ago.  Many years back in one of those Hollywood prop type auctions, I was bidding on a piece of art that I just had to have.   It was my absolute favorite painting called Fright Night,  the open-mouthed skull with wild hair,  it was the original painting used for the opening episode of Night Gallery.  I was low on bucks at the time, and I got a quick credit card and maxed it out all at once for the painting, 5 figures.   I was the top bidder for the duration until it went to the auction floor for bidding in California.  I was crushed, it went for 25,000 dollars!  Years later after finding John on this site,  I asked him if he could faithfully reproduce the painting full size.  When the mail truck delivered the over-sized box and I opened it,  it actually took my breath away!!   He had done one of the best reproductions I've ever seen on this piece, it was, and is, amazing!   It has been propped on a wooden artists stand in my living room ever since, in front of my skeleton.

BRICK

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Re: Opinions are like SKULLs ...
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2020, 11:04:50 AM »
They actually did poster reproductions of that Night Gallery piece (see below); of course there is nothing quite like having an actual painting.

When times are dark, donít consider art to be merely a distraction; rather, think of it as a lifeline-  Neil Gaiman paraphrase.

skully

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Re: Opinions are like SKULLs ...
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2020, 03:53:55 PM »
Hi BRICK.  Thanks for this photo.  I've heard stories about some of the original program show pieces sometimes being available for sale,  usually in auctions, there was quite a few paintings that were made for the show,  makes one wonder just what might have happened to them over the years.   I still retain quite a bit of original art in my collection,  however,  this is the only reproduction piece of an original that I own.  I've seen really bad copies of this painting sometimes listed on e-bay from mostly overseas painting galleries that looked like they were done quickly and sloppy, this piece of mine from John took him a while to finish and it's almost a dead ringer to the original,  so much so that his signature on the bottom of the painting,  with the exception of maybe a few slightly different brush strokes on the image is really the only way to tell that it's a copy.