Author Topic: Comic Book Collecting  (Read 1198 times)

Hepcat

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #75 on: May 20, 2020, 02:21:35 PM »
Blondie by Chic Young was another comic strip that was present from my first memories of the Saturday London Free Press' comic section:



Harvey published a whopping 148 issues of Blondie between 1950 and 1965, another whopping 140 issues of Dagwood between the same years, plus four Blondie & Dagwood Family Giants between 1963 and 1965:







Sadly I have exactly none of those issues in my collection currently even though they're not that pricey compared to superhero and many other kinds of comics. Someday, somehow I'd like to rectify that deficiency in my collection by getting a bunch in an auction lot.

 :)

« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 02:25:40 PM by Hepcat »
Collecting! It's what I do!

Hepcat

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #76 on: May 22, 2020, 01:09:50 PM »
Another newspaper strip that influenced my taste in comics for life was the Li'l Abner strip which was not within my memory even carried in the London Free Press. Nonetheless Li'l Abner was such a big time well-known character that I was already aware of his existence by the time the 1959 Li'l Abner movie came to London:



I knew I was missing out on something really good not getting the strip in the Free Press

Harvey published nine issues of Li'l Abner cover dated from December 1947 to February 1949. Here are scans of the two I have in my collection:





 :)
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 08:55:12 PM by Hepcat »
Collecting! It's what I do!

geezer butler

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #77 on: May 22, 2020, 07:42:57 PM »
I have some questions for the comic book collectors out there. I wanna see what others think.

Who can afford some of the prices out there for premium issues? I'm getting close to completing my Marvel 70s horror collection. I only need Werewolf by Night 32 and Tomb of Dracula 10.  All us monster/comic book nerds know the significance of those books.  Look up the prices on those books. If you can find a shoddy copy, you're still paying $300-$400.

So first of all, what's so significant about the first appearances of Blade and Moon Knight, respectively? I mean, as a monster nerd, I totally dig those characters, but let's me honest---we're not talking about first appearances of Captain American or Wolverine.

Second, again I ask who can afford to drop $700-$2500 on a single comic book? To be honest, I probably could afford that, but it wouldn't be responsible with our budget. And it's just the point. I understand supply and demand, and these are rare issues blah blah blah. I still think it's gouging.

Thanks for allowing me to rant.  >:(

Rex fury

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #78 on: May 23, 2020, 09:25:25 AM »
Thoughts on buying expensive comics will most likely generate a different answer from every collector who broaches the subject. In the past year I picked up a WBN 32 and a golden age Cap. for  roughly the prices you mention.
First, in the case of WBN 32, the comic will never be truly rare. Anybody who makes that argument should probably glance at the number of copies available on EBay at any given time. Nostalgia influenced my decision to purchase a copy, not the number of 9.8 graded books in any given census. Sometimes scarcity is used to justify pricing. Again, that argument falls flat for any comic produced after roughly 1965. Is Conan 3 or Howard the Duck 1 truly scarce? To answer that question one has to have a little knowledge of how returnable comics were dealt with in the late 60’s and early 70’s.  Comic dealers from that time period had the ability to buy huge amounts of comics which had been returned by news dealers. The whole operation was somewhat shady, but the bottom line is that books like Conan 3 were not as available in those bulk lots, hence dealers ( who couldn’t purchase it for pennies ) began listing it as scarce.
For a much more concise account of this practice may I recommend “Comic Book Wars” or other related histories. The bottom line on WBN 32 for me was that I wanted the book. I don’t think it’s “ significance” influenced my purchase.

On the other hand, in the case of Captain America Comics 26, I justified spending the money because the comic is scarce. I’ve watched for copies of this book to come up for sale over the years and it’s not like hunting for a copy of WBN. In the last few years, I’ve seen very few copies come up for sale with only one being listed well below 3000.00 dollars. Several years ago I was one of the minions who helped produce “The Photo Journal Guide To Comic Books” . At the time best efforts were made to determine the availability of most all golden age comics. Some issues just don’t exist in the numbers that make them readily available for purchase. Being a diver, a Schomburg collector, and very much comic book nerd, Cap 26 was a book I really wanted to add to my collection. The house is paid for, the kids both have college funds and I’m able to pay my bills every month, so I don’t feel irresponsible in making the purchase.
As with any collectible, it’s only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. I’d encourage fellow collector s to buy what they truly desire and can reasonably afford regardless of the  significance or hype surrounding the item.
RF

John Pertwee

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #79 on: May 23, 2020, 10:37:58 AM »
The only way you get those Tomb of Dracula or Werewolf by Night issues cheap is if someone posts a bunch of issues as a lot and you catch someone napping with a Buy it Now. I understand why Blade might be a little more to buy, but Moon Knight? That is the main reason I don't even try to get a complete run of that series. I was lucky enough to pick up a complete run of Tomb of Dracula back in the 80s. I paid $8 for #1 and $6 for #10 back then. years later when I was bagging and boarding them I laughed when I looked at the prices paid.

Hepcat

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #80 on: May 23, 2020, 10:54:42 AM »
I understand supply and demand, and these are rare issues blah blah blah.

I agree with Rex though. Those two issues aren't "rare". The reason the asking prices for those two issues are so high is because of the insanely high demand component of the supply-and-demand equation. And part of the demand is "speculative" demand meaning demand not motivated by aesthetics but arising from the belief that purchasing now will enable the purchaser to flip the comic for a higher price at some future date. Dealers/sellers encourage this kind of thinking of course.

But it's a bubble which will burst at some point. Not only are those issues not "rare" by Overstreet's definition of 50-100 copies in existence (scarce defined as 100-1000 copies in existence), but they're not rare in any sense of the word. As Rex says, no comic published after 1965 can be termed "rare". In particular Bronze Age superhero and horror comics are common as spit. "Collectible" comics by the late sixties were being hoarded by the tens of thousands and can be found all over the place (albeit not necessarily at reasonable asking prices). In fact, I'm willing to say that anybody telling you that any post-1965 comic is "rare" is simply a shyster trying to justify his ridiculous asking price. If you don't believe me, just check Ebay to see how many of any such comic are listed for sale at any given time.

Even highly prized (high priced) issues of Marvel superhero comics, e.g. Fantastic Four, Amazing Spider-Man, from earlier in the sixties can very easily be found. Even if your local comic shop doesn't have a decent one for sale, rest assured that if you're willing to pay the price he knows where he can get you one with a quick phone call by next morning if not later the same day.

Interesting that just eighteen months ago or so a fellow on a comic forum posted pics of what he termed his "rarest" ten Marvel comics which all turned out to be superhero comics from the Silver Age. I replied that none of those comics was rare and that they were simply high-priced. I added that I would have been more impressed had he owned nice copies for example of Marvels such as Homer the Happy Ghost 4 or Millie the Model 54. He was offended.

As far as my own collecting is concerned, I'm willing to pay up for scarcity but I'm very reluctant to pay up for high demand. As a result I'm now beginning to wonder whether I'll ever be able and willing to add a Brave and the Bold 28, Showcase 22 or a Flash 123 to my collection all of which of course are far pricier than surrounding issues. And when it comes to sports cards, I've now resigned myself to not completing sets because I'm not willing to pay for high priced rookie or super star cards. I'd rather have 100 "commons".

 :-\
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 09:02:36 PM by Hepcat »
Collecting! It's what I do!

Hepcat

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #81 on: May 23, 2020, 11:09:33 AM »
For a much more concise account of this practice may I recommend “Comic Book Wars” or other related histories.

To which exact publication are you referring?

 ???
« Last Edit: May 23, 2020, 12:17:33 PM by Hepcat »
Collecting! It's what I do!

Rex fury

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Re: Comic Book Collecting
« Reply #82 on: May 23, 2020, 06:55:00 PM »
Hep, I meant Howard Beerbohm’s “Comic Book Store Wars”; sorry for the inaccurate title in my earlier post. I’ve read several accounts of the practice of buying lots of returned comics by early comic dealers. Chuck Rozanski was involved and maybe Howard Rogofsky. Sorry I can’t recall all the sources, but I think “...Store Wars” was one of those.
RF