Author Topic: ‘Invisible Man’ Finds Director, Sets New Course for Universal’s Monster Legacy  (Read 1259 times)

Count_Zirock

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"The move is part of a fresh strategy for Universal’s monsters properties, bringing creative directors with distinctive visions to the classic characters and moving on from the interconnected Dark Universe concept."

https://variety.com/2019/film/news/universal-finds-director-invisible-man-studios-monster-legacy-1203117708/
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zombiehorror

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"The move is part of a fresh strategy for Universal’s monsters properties, bringing creative directors with distinctive visions to the classic characters and moving on from the interconnected Dark Universe concept."

"Fresh strategy".....that they tried in 2010 with The Wolfman and they still couldn't keep their ideas out of that one.  I have no expectations whatsoever.

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"The move is part of a fresh strategy for Universal’s monsters properties . . ."

Beware!
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LugosiFan25

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No thanks. Tired of Remake-reboot-reimagining-wood and their "modern interpretations". I'll stick to the classics.
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Notfornothing

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Universal has even lost the hardcore fans. This movie is doomed to failure!

the_last_gunslinger

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Universal has even lost the hardcore fans. This movie is doomed to failure!

In all fairness, the people on this board seem to be the hardest to please. When "The Mummy" (2017) came out, most people on here were decrying Universal's attempt at turning their beloved monster movies into big budget blockbuster action flicks. They demanded moderately budgeted horror movies by people who understand the genre and have a proven track record. That's what we're getting and as for me, I'm pretty exited for it.

Now if they drop the ball on this too, I'll be right their with the rest of you, torches and pitchfork in hand.
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Big Bad Wolf

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In all fairness, the people on this board seem to be the hardest to please. When "The Mummy" (2017) came out, most people on here were decrying Universal's attempt at turning their beloved monster movies into big budget blockbuster action flicks. They demanded moderately budgeted horror movies by people who understand the genre and have a proven track record. That's what we're getting and as for me, I'm pretty exited for it.

Now if they drop the ball on this too, I'll be right their with the rest of you, torches and pitchfork in hand.

Agreed. They're finally saying the right things. Whether or not they deliver, we'll see, but I had a feeling this would happen once Halloween proved to be a big success. If they're finally starting to take pitches from filmmakers who are passionate about the classic monsters and willing to let them do their own thing, it may be worth paying attention.
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zombiehorror

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Universal saying the right things doesn't mean much, it's their past actions that are the problem, continually worrying about the direction of projects instead of entrusting those they put in charge.  By letting Blumhouse take charge hopefully they are staying completely out of it and will let Invisible Man stand or fall on their shoulders....although we know if it succeeds Universal will take full credit.

TheMadScientist

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I'm cautiously optimistic. I didn't love the new Halloween movie, but Blumhouse does have a good track record (at least when it comes to make profitable movies). I'll be interested to see who they get to direct and star. Invisible Man was never my favorite Universal Monster, but if it looks good I'll be there. Hopefully they get a chance to make movies for the other monsters, and take a similar approach. Medium sized horror movies that embrace the Universal designs is the way to go, in my opinion.

Big Bad Wolf

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Universal saying the right things doesn't mean much, it's their past actions that are the problem, continually worrying about the direction of projects instead of entrusting those they put in charge.  By letting Blumhouse take charge hopefully they are staying completely out of it and will let Invisible Man stand or fall on their shoulders....although we know if it succeeds Universal will take full credit.
Well there's the rub, of course. They're saying the right things, but will they keep their word? At the very least they've heard the criticism against turning them away from horror and have taken a big step toward fixing that. Hence why they went to Blumhouse, which is known largely for its horror films of course.

What they need to do now is trust them to do their own thing and stick with their stated game plan, which is to get talented filmmakers who care about these monsters and let them do their thing.

If they're currently taking pitches as we speak, we may be hearing more and more about other filmmakers coming aboard for other monsters, and once we get an idea the kind of talent they're gunning for, it may paint a clearer picture of what to expect. I'd keep an eye on guys like Mike Flanagan for instance, or Jordan Peele. MAYBE even James Wan, though he's been much more friendly with Warner Bros lately.
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Monsters For Sale

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No thanks. Tired of Remake-reboot-reimagining-wood and their "modern interpretations". I'll stick to the classics.


When it comes to the gothic, old world, steampunk era classics, I'm right there with you.

But a fresh, present-day science take on invisibility could be interesting.  Something between the chemically-induced invisibility of Claude Rains and the electronic clarity of The Philadelphia Experiment might actually be interesting - in the right hands.

"Hollow Man" wasn't all bad.
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geezer butler

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I'm open minded. I really liked the new Halloween film. In terms of the Universal reboots, I absolutely love the Wolfman, think Dracula Untold is ok, and while I dont hate the Mummy, it's pretty underwhelming. So in my mind an Invisible Man reboot can go either way it seems. 

zombiehorror

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Blumhouse chief Jasom Blum and the producer talks about.....

....Blumhouse teaming with Universal;
“I don’t believe in saying “We’re going to do movies about this” and then trying to find a movie about it. So I didn’t believe in going and saying ‘I want to do all these movies’, and then try to find directors to do them. We have a director who… we’ve also done six or seven movies with, pitched us this spectacular idea about Invisible Man. We told him to write it, he wrote it, then we took it to the studio and said ‘We’d love to do this and this is what we would do with it,’ and they said yes.”

....director Leigh Whannell's vision;
“It was like the Blumhouse version of The Invisible Man, it’s a lower-budget movie. It’s not dependent on special effects, CGI, stunts. It’s super character-driven, it’s really compelling, it’s trilling, it’s edgy, it feels new. Those were all things that felt like they fit with what our company does. And it happened to be an Invisible Man story, so it checked both boxes. And we responded to it because I think Leigh is just an A+ director.”

....the films budget;
“We’re definitely in our zone, I don’t know if it’s going to be strictly five [million]. It’s not going to be more than ten, I don’t think.”

......future scripts, possibly using ones submitted for the Dark Universe previously;
“We have actually, we haven’t figured it out yet, but we’ve looked at a couple older scripts and we would be open to doing that”

http://collider.com/the-invisible-man-movie-jason-blum/

TheMadScientist

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When it comes to the gothic, old world, steampunk era classics, I'm right there with you.

But a fresh, present-day science take on invisibility could be interesting.  Something between the chemically-induced invisibility of Claude Rains and the electronic clarity of The Philadelphia Experiment might actually be interesting - in the right hands.

"Hollow Man" wasn't all bad.

I think a modern Invisible Man could work well, but I can't imagine versions of a lot of the other Universal Monsters set in the modern day that wouldn't come across as kinda silly. Maybe the Creature from the Black Lagoon or Wolf Man. For instance, I don't think you could do a Dracula or Frankenstein set in the modern day, without having to completely change their Universal designs. Otherwise I think it would just come across as silly. My ideal movies would be similar to the Penny Dreadful TV series from a few years ago.  Set in the Victorian era, but with a modern style and sensibility. 

Big Bad Wolf

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I generally prefer them in a period setting too, although I must admit that Bernard Rose's recent Frankenstein, which had a modern day setting, surprised me with how great it was.
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