Author Topic: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful  (Read 1024 times)

Hepcat

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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #31 on: February 11, 2019, 04:46:55 PM »
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Wicked Lester

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2019, 09:22:49 PM »
I think the early success of sh*tbags like Madonna,  began that long downward spiral (definitely aided by MTV).
  Mord, I can understand your view point on Madonna. My late wife and I back in the mid 80-'s would do a bong and beer or two on a Friday after work and have a great time reveling in the work week done. Commercial,absolutely. In that period I was also into very diverse bans ranging from Dead Kennedy's to Black Flag to early death metal. I used to be almost Fascist and Nazi like in my musical appreciation. So to get to my point across,anyone that actually reads this thread please bear with me and please listen to my points on how music can have a HUGE impact on your life and entire belief system.   
 
       The System- Their Corrupting Ways. BTDT,Wife lost her job and with a lot of searching moved 15 miles farther north from my job. I f&*%ing hate the system. The day we signed our papers for our townhousw we were literally 24 hrs from getting kicked out of our house/ foreclosure. BASTARDS!

Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2019, 11:05:54 PM »
Look at the famous(ly crapty) boy bands. Not a real band but a corporate creation to again pacify the masses with yet another diversion on society.

"Pacify the masses with yet another diversion on society"? Oh come on!  :o

Don't be silly. Boy bands were created (and will continue to be created) for one reason and one reason only. To make money. That's what it's all about. No need to saddle the phenomenon with any kind of more complex sociological baggage. There's no conspiracy here; it's simply about the money.

And don't misunderstand. I'm not condemning that single underlying motivation. It's what fills supermarket aisles and makes the world go round. Remove that motivation and you get empty store shelves like in every Marxist backwater you care to name.

 C:)
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 11:23:47 PM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #34 on: February 12, 2019, 10:52:35 AM »
Pretty good piece, there.  I think that, currently, there is a Shotgun Effect of Talent, where kajillions of pellet-like artists go blasting out and hope to hit multiple playlists.  I suspect that, eventually, this will be honed down back to a Tin Pan Alley Effect, where a select few have been settled on and thus fill up single playlists that are massively shared.

That used to be Radio.  Tune into the city's favorite AM station in the '60s, and you and your friends were assured of hearing the same songs, able to like or dislike them, share your favorites in malt-shops and burger drive-in's, and go to school the next day and ask about hearing That New One.  And someone would surely respond.

Today's Playlist Mentality is basically "Every Listener Is An Island" with their playlist isolated from everyone else.  Until someone shares one.  Then probably shares about 100 too many and finally I cut them off and only pretend to accept downloads or invites.  And I'm back to my own playlist.  On that island.

I think the simplistic argument presented in this YouTube video misses other issues: just about every popular album has unfavorite songs, too.  The songs handed to Ringo during the first half of Beatles recordings were simply terrible choices - until he did the most excellent ACT NATURALLY with George's fantastic guitar work - which was merely modeled after the Bakersfield Buck Owens style.  But there are plenty of clunkers on sooo many albums. 

It's just that the Hits were played ad nauseum over a town's Top 40 radio and 'everyone' agreed this was A Hit.  There is no consensus like that now because there is no dependency on any single Top 40 Radio.  Or Radio, at all. 

This is not the musicians' fault.  This is entirely the labels' and distributors' fault.  THEY created this monster.

I think the music world would be far better off using the KAZAA model of music distribution: where Counts are public and available, not Apple/AndroidPlay where all accounting ripoffs mimic record-sales ripoffs against the artists.  Except now, the A-PLAY facilities require almost no capital expense on the distributor's part - they don't hafta pay for vinyl or CD-petrochemical blanks, or liner notes, or freight and shipping.  Maybe pay a photog for an "album cover".  Or maybe they'll create a half-million-dollar video when all I ever wanna do is just seem them play the song.  Live.  With great audio fidelity.

The demise of the record industry is THEIR creation, this is what THEY asked for.  I'm just glad that so many musicians are still out there, entertaining anyone who wants to sit and listen.

Okay, but none of what you say addresses the point of the Youtube video. The video doesn't deal with whether a few "top forty" tunes are universally popular or whether thousands of tunes have a niche market following; it deals with the increasing homogenization/sameness of pop music these days across both many specific artists' catalogue as well as across artists. There's been a dramatic decrease in timbral diversity in pop music over the last fifty+ years. Moreover present day pop hits all tend to feature the "millennial whoop" sound pattern which is not at all surprising since the majority of pop hits these days are written by one of two fellows, Max Martin or Lukasz Gottwald.

 ???
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 12:06:29 PM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2019, 11:29:49 AM »
Don't forget the early "video" (16mm film) jukeboxes.

https://www.cultofmac.com/326640/kitschy-scopitone-jukebox-brought-the-jams-before-mtv/


Quote from: David Pierini
...there were about 715 (Scopitone) machines in the U.S. (by the late sixties).

(Bob) Orlowsky said there are a number of reasons why the machines never captured nothing more than a passing fascination in the U.S. Tone-def executives failed to see the cultural revolution unfolding. Rather than play a part in the rebellious spirit of rock and roll, Scopitone tried to appeal to mostly middle-aged white men.

“Scopitone was on the wrong side of the cultural divide,” Orlowsky said. “They placed their money on men and standards and acts that were going rapidly out of fashion.”


My recollection of the Scopitone machines was consistent with Orlowsky's observations. I knew of two in London, Ontario in the 1971-72 period, one in the men's beverage room at the York Hotel near the train station and the other in the men's beverage room at the Oxford House. (Prior to 1971 I was below legal drinking age to enter such establishments.) As the name "men's beverage room" suggests, it's where men went to drink, typically Labatt's IPA on draft at twenty cents for a seven ounce glass. The Scopitone machines in these rooms had basically no songs to tempt a young rock music fan, and the only selection that I can recall that received any play was one where a topless black woman was shown for perhaps twenty seconds, which is why my buddies and I referred to it as the Porno-Vu machine. But like I say, these were men's beverage rooms where hard core drinkers as opposed to rock fans congregated so the selections in the Scopitone machine and really the only one that got any play weren't at all surprising in retrospect. The machines were gone by about 1973. They were replaced by other electronic games and then pinball machines.









 :)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2019, 10:09:59 PM by Hepcat »
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marsattacks666

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #36 on: February 12, 2019, 02:21:29 PM »
There was a similar machine in the 80s. I cannot remember the name of the company or how long the video machine lasted. But, during the 80s. a
Video jukebox were in many arcades.
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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2019, 04:34:02 PM »
I want to continue the argument about radio's demise being linked to the perception of 'no good modern music'. 

There's the opening lyrics to FUN FUN FUN...

Well she got her daddy's car
And she cruised through the hamburger stand now
Seems she forgot all about the library
Like she told her old man now
And with the radio blasting
Goes cruising just as fast as she can now


Please correct my before-my-times lack-of-memory... this scenario seems to suggest that kids went to a hang-out spot, had windows open, tops down and radios were probably tuned into the same station, everyone listening to the same songs.  OR if there were competing stations, cars were probably organized one Station 1 in this parking area, Station 2 in that, etc.

This is the Shared Experience I think of, and without Shared Experiences involving the same music being played at the same time, same place with the same people, there is no communal 'bonding' with that music.

CHLO in St. Thomas just south of London was throughout the early and mid-sixties the only Top 40 station in the immediate London, Ontario area and got therefore the bulk of the teen demographic. CHLO didn't get any competition until CJBK arrived on the London scene in 1967 with a top forty format. As a result, yes, young people in London and area all listened to the same top forty recordings. But!!! The top forty hits were all very different from each other. There was no sameness to the sound. The hits featured nothing akin to the present day "millennial whoop". And the point of the opening video of this thread and the other links I posted is not that everybody today listens to the same tracks, it's that there is less variety, more sameness, in all pop music these days.

Interesting though that it was the launch of DJ Thomas Aquinas' thirty minute progressive rock show on a middle-of-the-road station, CFPL in London, in 1968 that really helped to spur the expansion of my musical horizons. Here are some of the tracks that I remember hearing on Aquinas' show for the first time thus serving as my introduction to that specific band:

Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun - Pink Floyd
Piece of My Heart - Big Brother & the Holding Company
Paper Sun(?) - Traffic
A Song for Jeffrey - Jethro Tull
Communication Breakdown - Led Zeppelin (unless I'd already heard Good Times Bad Times on another station)
Jingo Rock - Santana
The Court of the Crimson King - King Crimson
Hear Me Calling - Ten Years After
1984 - Spirit
Sonny Boy Williamson - Mike Bloomfield & Al Kooper
Rondo '69 (or else America) - The Nice
Better By You, Better Than Me - Spooky Tooth
The Green Manalishi (With the Two Prong Crown) - Fleetwood Mac

My impressionable young mind was of course ripe to be exposed to more complex and sophisticated forms of rock music and I soaked it all up like a sponge. I clearly wasn't the only listener doting on his program because it was soon expanded to an hour. 

No "Remember Friday night's a Al's, listening to music, eating burgers, drinking cokes?"

Is this a correct scenario?  Was it common?  (I never had any of this until I settled down and Hubby knew these places to frequent.  I would have loved these, as a teenager.  They are still cool places, too.)

I remember no such places that functioned as hangouts for teens in London from 1965 onward. In grade school we just hung out out on the street and played in backyards and in neighbourhood parks. By the time I was in high school the area park was where many teens hung out. Quite simply it cost money, which was naturally scarce, to "hang out" in diners. Sure on occasion we'd hit Harvey's or A & W, but we'd eat and go. There was no place to "hang out". Granted that my older brother-in-law still fondly remembers the Parkside Dairy Bar on Dundas Street in East London but I suspect that it wasn't actually a hangout. Teenagers bought their hot dogs and ice cream sodas or milkshakes, consumed them at the counter and then left. Similarly the Whistle Stop Drive-In with its famous foot longs on the edge of my immediate neighbourhood had a loyal though often older clientele, but I don't recall it being a hang-out.

In fact I very clearly remember wondering whether places like the Pop's Chock'lit Shoppe featured in Archie comics were common in the States because I wasn't aware of such an equivalent in my part of town. I sort of wondered whether it might be a California thing because I encountered nothing like Pop's in Detroit. The Elias Bros. Big Boy Restaurants in Detroit were very cool, but I don't think they were  hang-outs. Like I say, hanging out in restaurants cost money.

 :)
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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #38 on: February 14, 2019, 09:43:23 AM »
Here are a couple more good Scopitone reels:



The Night Has a Thousand Eyes - Bobby Vee



Calendar Girl - Neil Sedaka

 8)
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Hepcat

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Re: The TRUTH Why Modern Music Is Awful
« Reply #39 on: February 14, 2019, 09:51:11 AM »
Another way of putting the issue/situation:

Quote from: It's All Noise - The New Yorker
We live in the loudest of times. It all began about twenty years ago, when new digital technologies started to radically alter the way music was made, refined, and shared. It suddenly became fairly easy to endow songs with a more aggressive presence: with a click of the mouse, you just made it all—especially the quiet parts—louder. Since then, there’s been a debate over the effects of the “loudness wars” on our ability to appreciate nuance, particularly the dynamic range between loud and soft that, in the parlance of audiophiles, gives music the room to “breathe.” As musicians from Iggy Pop to Christina Aguilera began making their music as thunderous as possible, our standards and preferences gradually changed. Loudness has won. We have come to crave music that is garish, punchy, and, according to the anti-loudness partisans, poorly engineered. But now that we listen to music everywhere—often in a semi-distracted state, across a range of devices and settings—it should come as no surprise that artists want their music to come pre-coated with a glossy immediacy. First impressions matter. Why not insure that you can’t be ignored?

Think of how many contemporary pop hits sound as if they were being belted from within a jet engine. The quiet parts of a Taylor Swift song buzz more boldly than the brashest moments of a heavy-metal album from the nineteen-eighties. The imperfections that resulted when artists pushed their recordings past peak levels have given way, in pop music, to new techniques, textures, and tastes. It’s just how music sounds now, from the noisy, self-conscious revolt of Kanye West’s “Yeezus” and the distorted crunch that occurs when a pop song hits the chorus to the way that MP3s gleam with a pre-formatted sizzle.

 :-\
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