Author Topic: Cryptids, anyone?  (Read 14489 times)

Memphremagog

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2017, 02:17:23 PM »
One of my favorite subjects...I'm a firm believer in Bigfoot since I had my own encounter 35 years ago. I've never seen another one since, but I know for a fact they're out there.

I was helping my dad cut firewood in Rock Creek, Ohio in the fall of 1982.  We were in a densely wooded area alongside some railroad tracks on land owned by my dad's work.  They gave him permission to cut wood there.

He had already cut down several small trees with a chainsaw, and was splitting them into smaller logs which I carried out of the woods and loaded into the back of our truck. On a return trip I saw something move directly in front of me and looked up to see a seven foot apelike creature watching me from behind a tree.

I screamed and ran as fast as I could to my dad. I told him what happened but he pretty much laughed it off and said I probably imagined it. I did not. That encounter has haunted me my whole life.
It fascinates me but also creeps me out knowing these creatures are out there just beyond our reach, watching us.

I love hearing about firsthand encounters like this; there have been far too many people in this country(not to mention, worldwide) who have had experiences such as this with some kind of primitive humanoid..not all of these are hoaxes, misidentifications of known animals or hallucinations. People are seeing and encountering something in the woods out there..
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long live kong

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2017, 02:43:44 PM »
English winters? Ffffttttt. Big cats would have no problem whatsoever withy the relatively mild English winters. Snow leopards, Siberian tigers and Canadian cougars deal easily with far harsher winter weather conditions.



 cl:)


I know some cats can easily survive in freezing climates, buy would all big cats thrive and more importantly breed in colder climates? Would a lion for instance, normally found in hot regions like North Africa happily breed in a relatively cold climate like England? I suppose so, but it always struck me as absurd that a big cat normally associated with the searing heat of the sahara could happily settle and breed in the boggy moors of Yorkshire!
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Remco Wolfman

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2017, 05:26:48 PM »
I know some cats can easily survive in freezing climates, buy would all big cats thrive and more importantly breed in colder climates? Would a lion for instance, normally found in hot regions like North Africa happily breed in a relatively cold climate like England? I suppose so, but it always struck me as absurd that a big cat normally associated with the searing heat of the sahara could happily settle and breed in the boggy moors of Yorkshire!

I can speak fairly authoritatively on this topic. Something like a jaguar (coloration can be spotted or a dark black pigment) could probably/maybe survive in a climate like The UK or in the US maybe Virginia. Their historical native habitat runs from the very southern tip of Brazil to Arizona, Texas and other Southern US states. Every now and then they still make their way into the continental US. Some parts of the territory mentioned above actually get quite cold and even has snowfall in winter months.

Could a Bengal tiger or lion survive in that type of climate. Maybe. Not thrive, but survive is possible.

Ludi

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2017, 06:20:54 PM »
No proof of this has ever been established despite decades of rumor and conjecture, in fact, more anthropologists who have studied the film have concluded that no human wearing a suit could have replicated the walk as shown by the figure in the film..

Nonsense.  I have made fake animals and creatures for showbiz for 30 years, and I say it is a guy in a suit.


Memphremagog

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #34 on: October 22, 2017, 06:41:02 PM »
Nonsense.  I have made fake animals and creatures for showbiz for 30 years, and I say it is a guy in a suit.

It isnt nonsense when biologists and anthropologists have done study after study and proved that it cant be duplicated. I'm sure your credentials are no better than theirs,no offense..you can say what you like but you have nothing to prove it other than your opinion.  The studies and experiments outweigh that, I'm afraid. 50 years ago when the footage was taken, there was NO existing technology in special effects anywhere that could have produced this so-called suit, despite the third party claims(all of which have been disproven) to the contrary. You may have been making creatures for 30 years but I'm sure you could not duplicate this. Many have tried and not one single experiment by guys with suits has succeeded yet. The motion of the musculature and gait does not lend credence to any guy in a suit.  I'm sure that if it was truly a suit, with today's technology, it could have been duplicated and probably improved upon. Yet another reason why this does not hold water as it hasnt been done. You cant improve on nature with some character costume, no matter who designed it.  The laws of physics that were applied in trying to recreate the footage in a suit just dont hold water upon scrutiny.

« Last Edit: October 22, 2017, 06:53:59 PM by Memphremagog »
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long live kong

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #35 on: October 22, 2017, 11:35:56 PM »
I can speak fairly authoritatively on this topic. Something like a jaguar (coloration can be spotted or a dark black pigment) could probably/maybe survive in a climate like The UK or in the US maybe Virginia. Their historical native habitat runs from the very southern tip of Brazil to Arizona, Texas and other Southern US states. Every now and then they still make their way into the continental US. Some parts of the territory mentioned above actually get quite cold and even has snowfall in winter months.

Could a Bengal tiger or lion survive in that type of climate. Maybe. Not thrive, but survive is possible.
Cheers Remco Wolfman!
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Hepcat

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #36 on: October 23, 2017, 10:37:06 AM »
I know some cats can easily survive in freezing climates, buy would all big cats thrive and more importantly breed in colder climates? Would a lion for instance, normally found in hot regions like North Africa happily breed in a relatively cold climate like England? I suppose so, but it always struck me as absurd that a big cat normally associated with the searing heat of the sahara could happily settle and breed in the boggy moors of Yorkshire!


Actually lions in particular do quite well in more temperate climates. They could still be found in Greece and southeastern Europe in Roman times, and they absolutely thrive and breed vigorously in North American parks such as African Lion Safari here in southwestern Ontario:

African Lion Safari



I believe that jaguars, leopards and cheetahs could/would quickly adapt to colder climates as well but admittedly I can't say I'm sure of this.

 :-\



« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 12:25:09 PM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #37 on: October 23, 2017, 12:32:12 PM »
The Amur leopard is another big cat that does quite well in sub-Arctic environments:



 :-\
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long live kong

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #38 on: October 23, 2017, 01:09:18 PM »
The Amur leopard is another big cat that does quite well in sub-Arctic environments:



 :-\

My favourite big cat is the jaguar. Such an awesome beast.
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Hepcat

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #39 on: October 23, 2017, 01:34:34 PM »
At 1500 pounds per square inch, jaguars have far and away the most bite strength of any big cat and their bite strength is behind that of only Nile crocodiles, saltwater crocodiles, American alligators and hippos (and ahead of sharks!). Jaguars use their bite strength to bite through to the brain cases of the crocodiles they hunt:







 8)
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long live kong

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #40 on: October 23, 2017, 01:44:29 PM »

I rest my case!  8)
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long live kong

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #41 on: October 23, 2017, 02:40:12 PM »
Some sumptuous illustrations from 'The Spine Chilling Book of Monsters', which includes several chapters on various cryptids. This book was a favourite of mine as a kid, along with it's companion book 'The Spine Chilling Book of Horror'.




« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 04:32:00 PM by long live kong »
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Remco Wolfman

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #42 on: October 24, 2017, 11:51:06 AM »
I picked the book "Monster Hunt: The Guide to Cryptozoology" up on clearance at Barnes & Noble a few years ago. It's a pretty awesome book:



It breaks up cryptids by continent:



And then by Cryptid located on that continent with between a couple and several pages on each creature:



« Last Edit: October 24, 2017, 12:17:11 PM by Remco Wolfman »

Memphremagog

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #43 on: October 24, 2017, 01:45:43 PM »
Eyewitness sketch of the Dover Demon in 1977 at Dover, MA.

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Memphremagog

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Re: Cryptids, anyone?
« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2017, 04:59:37 PM »
Artist's depiction of the Lizard Man of Scape Ore Swamp, South Carolina.

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