Author Topic: The Bride of Frankenstein  (Read 426 times)

Remco Wolfman

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The Bride of Frankenstein
« on: May 31, 2017, 03:53:17 PM »
I have a question that some of the more mature folks might be able to answer. I was born in the 80's, so for a lot of my life the only Uni Monster stuff that existed (in my world) were the Remco Mini Monsters, the Imperial 8" monsters and the Crestwood House Monster Series books (where my entire education of monsters was formulated). My question is did the Bride of Frankenstein (the actual Bride - not the movie) just suddenly become a big deal during the 90's or had she been historically popular among monster kids? 

I ask because there was almost no reference to her in the 80's (that I was aware of) and then in the 90's she suddenly showed up in all kinds of marketing. I remember when I actually saw the Bride of Frankenstein movie I was waiting, and waiting... and waiting for the title character to make an appearance. It was a bit underwhelming (although the movie itself was great). 

Was she regarded as a main Uni character in the 50's - 70's?

Kidagain

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Re: The Bride of Frankenstein
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2017, 05:30:11 PM »
Since i'm one of the "Oldie But A Goody " peeps around here I really don't remember a lot of merchandise on the Bride back in the 50s and 60s. It could be that I was not as interested in her as I was in the rest of the Universal Monsters.Maybe some of the other Oldsters here could have a different memory of the Bride than me.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2017, 05:41:51 PM by Kidagain »

Mike Scott

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Re: The Bride of Frankenstein
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2017, 07:07:36 PM »
She started off strong with a great Aurora kit, but then virtually vanished until Sideshow expanded the monster line in the '90s. There was a little gumball toy in the '60s, an appearance on the '79 lunchbox and a Esco statue in the 80s, but not much else.

Young boys didn't typically play with "girl" toys. When the monsters became adult "collectibles", The Bride was back! (Along with the (until then) virtually "unseen" Invisible Man.)
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Lunkenstein

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Re: The Bride of Frankenstein
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2017, 07:13:08 PM »
She's on Sven tonight.
Paul

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Re: The Bride of Frankenstein
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2017, 07:27:51 PM »
She started off strong with a great Aurora kit, but then virtually vanished until Sideshow expanded the monster line in the '90s. There was a little gumball toy in the '60s, an appearance on the '79 lunchbox and a Esco statue in the 80s, but not much else.

Young boys didn't typically play with "girl" toys. When the monsters became adult "collectibles", The Bride was back! (Along with the (until then) virtually "unseen" Invisible Man.)

The Sideshow era has proved to be the most respectful and expansive of the licensed materials offered over the last 30 years. Werewolf of London, Mole people, Metaluna Mutant, Ygor, Lawrence Talbot, Invisible Man, Bela the Gypsy, Fritz and Renfield, Nosferatu, London After Midnight, etc, etc, in the realm of obscure characters being observed. Diversity of items revolved around painted statue dioramas, Premium format figures, life sized busts, action figures, 1/6 scale figures, novelties, etc. Sideshow did something no one else did before....and may never do again. Offered an array of wide scale licensed items. Before they came to be....such things were confined to the realm of garage kits. It was a great time to collect.

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Re: The Bride of Frankenstein
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2017, 07:37:55 PM »
The Sideshow era has proved to be the most respectful and expansive of the licensed materials offered over the last 30 years. Werewolf of London, Mole people, Metaluna Mutant, Ygor, Lawrence Talbot, Invisible Man, Bela the Gypsy, Fritz and Renfield, Nosferatu, London After Midnight, etc, etc, in the realm of obscure characters being observed. Diversity of items revolved around painted statue dioramas, Premium format figures, life sized busts, action figures, 1/6 scale figures, novelties, etc. Sideshow did something no one else did before....and may never do again. Offered an array of wide scale licensed items. Before they came to be....such things were confined to the realm of garage kits. It was a great time to collect.

Especially when the items offered were widely available and cheap!  SS became really specialized and pricey at the end of the UM run.  Those early years were really cool, though.  Would love to see someone try to recreate that.