Author Topic: 1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?  (Read 71 times)

Memphremagog

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1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?
« on: January 05, 2020, 01:28:45 PM »
One hundred years ago, the cinema saw the first big boom of horror films during the silent era. Yes, there were genre releases prior to this, however, not with such famous and long-lasting as some of the films released during that year..

THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI(1920)

Featuring Werner Krauss as the Doctor, Conrad Veidt as Cesare the Somnambulist and Lil Dagover as the Heroine.

Coming from Germany, this nightmarish tale was the first really famous of the horrors to come and would introduce themes that have survived throughout the decades in the horror film and are still used today. The first of the horrors exploiting German expressionism, but not the last by far.





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Memphremagog

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Re: 1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2020, 01:36:55 PM »
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde(1920)

Matinee idol of the day, John Barrymore took the previously filmed story of Jekyll/Hyde and made it a memorable performance in the first big horror hit for the US. His creepy, degenerate Mr.Hyde would set the stage for many adaptions in the future and is still a fascinating study in silent horror..another version featuring Sheldon Lewis was issued just prior to the Barrymore version, however, Barrymore's performance soon eclipsed the Lewis version for that year.







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Memphremagog

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Re: 1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2020, 01:45:05 PM »
The Golem(1920)

The Hebrew legend was brought to life in this German film with Paul Wegener as the Golem(a role he would play three times), previously appearing in a lost 1916 film as the creature. This film dealt with his origins and remains as a classic in the man made monster storytelling.





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Mike Scott

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Re: 1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2020, 03:07:51 PM »
Three classics, to be sure!  I wish we could watch Murnau's Jekyll & Hyde and that Italian Frankenstein film.
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Mord

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Re: 1920: The First Big Year For Horror Films?
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2020, 03:39:20 PM »
Exceptional starting year for the horror genre (followed 2 years later by Nosferatu)