Author Topic: How I became a monster loving kid and the monster toy enthusiast I am today!  (Read 7284 times)

Hepcat

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Monster specific, it may have been spotting Famous Monsters (#39) for the first time at the tender age of 5.


It must have been this one then:





I may have first noticed Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine on the newsstand early in 1962 just before I turned ten. But as I mentioned previously, I thought a magazine about films had to be for bigger kids, especially at that price point of $0.35!

:o

I therefore never bought any as a kid.

 :(
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 09:07:45 AM by Hepcat »
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horrorhunter

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FM #28 is the first one I ever bought.



This is dated May 1964 so it probably hit the stands in March. I had just turned 5 when I probably picked this up from a magazine rack at a grocery store or drug store (I don't remember going to newsstands until I was older). I bought several FMs after that up through my teenage years. The early ones I bought were read until the covers fell off. I never cut mine up for scrapbooks and such like a lot of kids did but they were read so much they just fell apart.

Around 2000 I got serious about my monster mag collection and finished my FM run with mostly nice copies within about 8 years. I don't have the variants of #7 and the nearly impossible to own variant of #6 but I do have the "Ghouls Eye sticker" variant of #4 as well as the regular versions of those issues. Also have all the Ferry issues  ::) and the Kim issues up to a point. I gave up on the new version over a year ago because it strayed too far for my taste.

I quit buying new monster mags over a year ago with the exception of The Creeps. I have over 3K monster mags and I'm practically out of room, Mylar bags, and acid free boxes so I called it good and just stopped. Never did technically finish the Warrens- still need the Saha book, Eerie #1, the westerns, and a couple of Screen Thrills Illustrated. I refuse to pay anywhere near what that Saha mag costs so I'll never own it unless I find it cheap from a seller who doesn't know it's value. It has nothing to do with the Horror that made Warren great so I don't miss it, in fact it's really trivial junk. The westerns, Eerie #1, and the Screen Thrills I still plan to get at some point. Those are real deal Warren goodness. I'm pretty happy with my monster mag collection the way it is. Lotsa good reading for a Monsterkid. :)
ALWAYS MONSTERING...

LundyAfterMidnight

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It must have been this one then:





I may have first noticed Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine on the newsstand early in 1962 just before I turned ten. As I mentioned previously, I thought a magazine about films had to be for bigger kids, especially at that price point of $0.35!


 :o


Quite right, Hep! I still recall being mesmerized by the photo of Baragon spewing lightning at it's fleeing victims. By the way, I appreciate your recollections.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2017, 02:43:15 AM by LundyAfterMidnight »
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Hepcat

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The westerns, Eerie #1, and the Screen Thrills I still plan to get at some point. Those are real deal Warren goodness.

I agree! The westerns are particularly cool and an excellent value proposition given their scarcity. That's because a lot of Warren monster mag collectors ignore the westerns.

 cl:)
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horrorhunter

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I agree! The westerns are particularly cool and an excellent value proposition given their scarcity.

 cl:)
You betcha! Issues 2-4 had Jack Davis covers and 5 and 6 featured covers by Basil Gogos.  ;)

ALWAYS MONSTERING...

skully

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Horrorhunter, interesting.  Issue # 28 was also the first issue that I bought in 1964, 10 years old at the time.  My mom was with me that evening when I went to Moyers Variety store here in Reading at South 9th. St.  She told me to put the magazine under my shirt so my dad wouldn't see it. She knew I "craved" monsters, and let me purchase it.  But, as fate would have it, my dad found it under my shirt as we walked in, and immediately threw the mag across the floor while shouting, "so, THIS is what you're reading instead of doing your homework!!", ( I actually hated school), and the mag ripped at the spine, but I retrieved it and put it away. I'll never forget that evening, it had such an impact on me, like I did something very, very wrong.  But, when you tell a kid who "lusts" for something that he can't have it, well, he usually WANTS IT MORE!!  Which, was my case.  Fast forward to today, I have 2 kids, (well, actually adults now), and 2 grandchildren, and,when they want to watch a horror flick, or purchase a monster type item, I encourage them to do so, and, you know what, they never tire of my stories that I tell them about how it was years ago when I was growing up, sometimes they even envy me for growing up in those times in a world that they'll obviously never know.

horrorhunter

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Horrorhunter, interesting.  Issue # 28 was also the first issue that I bought in 1964, 10 years old at the time.  My mom was with me that evening when I went to Moyers Variety store here in Reading at South 9th. St.  She told me to put the magazine under my shirt so my dad wouldn't see it. She knew I "craved" monsters, and let me purchase it.  But, as fate would have it, my dad found it under my shirt as we walked in, and immediately threw the mag across the floor while shouting, "so, THIS is what you're reading instead of doing your homework!!", ( I actually hated school), and the mag ripped at the spine, but I retrieved it and put it away. I'll never forget that evening, it had such an impact on me, like I did something very, very wrong.  But, when you tell a kid who "lusts" for something that he can't have it, well, he usually WANTS IT MORE!!  Which, was my case.  Fast forward to today, I have 2 kids, (well, actually adults now), and 2 grandchildren, and,when they want to watch a horror flick, or purchase a monster type item, I encourage them to do so, and, you know what, they never tire of my stories that I tell them about how it was years ago when I was growing up, sometimes they even envy me for growing up in those times in a world that they'll obviously never know.
Thanks for sharing your memories, skully.

I was very lucky in that my parents never disapproved of my interest in monsters. I believe we grew up in the best time to be a kid. I wouldn't trade those times for anything.
ALWAYS MONSTERING...

Hepcat

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Issues 2-4 had Jack Davis covers and 5 and 6 featured covers by Basil Gogos.


This one's my favourite cover:



 8)
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 12:59:50 PM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Issue # 28 was also the first issue that I bought in 1964, 10 years old at the time.  My mom was with me that evening when I went to Moyers Variety store here in Reading at South 9th. St.  She told me to put the magazine under my shirt so my dad wouldn't see it. She knew I "craved" monsters, and let me purchase it.  But, as fate would have it, my dad found it under my shirt as we walked in, and immediately threw the mag across the floor while shouting, "so, THIS is what you're reading instead of doing your homework!!"....

Well at least your dad took an interest in how well you were doing in your studies. I've heard of parents who didn't care.

I was very lucky in that my parents never disapproved of my interest in monsters.

My mother seemed to understand the desires of young boys better than did my father. My father actively discouraged any interest I might have in monsters because "You know there are no such things as monsters!" He was being protective though since the campfire tales that the old women told when he was growing up in the old country left him with terrible nightmares as a kid. But he also confiscated my Brother Rat Fink T-shirt and my Rat Fink sweatshirt as soon as he saw them because he found them offensive. He was also dismissive of my comics as "monkeys".

 :(
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 01:43:21 PM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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... they never tire of my stories that I tell them about how it was years ago when I was growing up, sometimes they even envy me for growing up in those times in a world that they'll obviously never know.

I believe we grew up in the best time to be a kid. I wouldn't trade those times for anything.

Oh I agree! We grew up in the best of times for kids. Living standards had improved to the point that there was a plethora of luxuries such as stuff for kids on store shelves, much of which could be seen in ads on this new medium "television". Moreover we baby boomers were the last of the free range kids. Within fifteen years helicopter parenting became the vogue and kids could no longer just be kids and roam their neighbourhoods freely unaccompanied by adults.

 :(

But, when you tell a kid who "lusts" for something that he can't have it, well, he usually WANTS IT MORE!!  Which, was my case.  Fast forward to today, I have 2 kids, (well, actually adults now), and 2 grandchildren, and,when they want to watch a horror flick, or purchase a monster type item, I encourage them to do so....

Wait till they want a copy of Penthouse magazine!

 :laugh:
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 02:16:08 PM by Hepcat »
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horrorhunter

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Oh I agree! We grew up in the best of times for kids. Living standards had improved to the point that there was a plethora of luxuries such as stuff for kids on store shelves, much of which could be seen in ads on this new medium "television". Moreover we baby boomers were the last of the free range kids. Within fifteen years helicopter parenting became the vogue and kids could no longer just be kids and roam their neighbourhoods freely unaccompanied by adults.
Full agreement!

My mother was very protective but I was still allowed to bike and walk where I pleased as long as I did what was expected of me and made sure to eat. I usually chose to be at home because I wasn't forced to be at home. It would suck to be a kid now. You can't take a pocket knife to school. You can't have a schoolyard fight without police involvement. You can't say what you mean publically because of this politically correct fog that envelopes everyone. Wouldn't want to actually be honest and risk offending anyone, so everyone just thinks it and says it behind people's backs. Now it's about doping and arrest to try to keep kids in line. The freedoms we enjoyed as kids were gradually stripped away year by year and now here we are with everyone living a virtual life with their heads stuck in their phones and other devices because their real life has been slowly degraded to the point the virtual is preferable. No wonder some kids get pissed off and act out in crazy ways. The tyranny of too many rules and too many nosy people trying to run other's lives have put us in the present situation. I'm glad I grew up before the busybodies figured out how to fix everything::)
ALWAYS MONSTERING...

Wich2

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I know there are probably already several threads around here where we've discussed our personal genesises as Monsterkids. But anyhoo, this was my first FM:



I saw it at my midwestern smalltown newstand, where Mom got her copy of the Sunday New York Daily News (because of its crime stories), and where I got some of my comics. My eyes bugged out, and I asked for it as my 11th birthday present.

(This was about the time that I was first seeing the Uni classics, on late Saturday nights by way of Toledo's INFINITY and FT. Wayne's PSYCHO CINEMA.)

I was hooked, bought the mag with paper route money pretty regularly, and even had a subscription for a year. Also bought a few back issues from Captain Company, including the great Karloff Memorial issue, which I'd just missed when it was new.

Dad was fairly ambivalent about this stuff (though he did stay up once with me for THE MUMMY). Mom (see "crime stories," above) had been a THRILLER/ONE STEP BEYOND/HITCHCOCK/TWILIGHT ZONE fan, so she was fine with the genre.

My fandom has waxed and waned over the years, tempered by other interests and real life, but obviously (as a wise man once said) - Here I Stand!

-Craig

skully

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Horrorhunter and Hepcat, you've both "hit the pervrerbial" nail on the head!!  These are the very things that I was referring to as to the "psychological" aspect of loving monsters when we were kids(and, obviously still do), the times we knew back then, so much simpler.  Going on bicycle rides that lasted all day during summer vacations, dating girls that actually involved real talking, either on phone, or in person instead of text now, going to dances when there were real local bands playing instead of dj's or other, and fights after school, crap, I can't even remember how many I was involved with! It's funny, when I look back, I remember my dad vividly saying, "ok kids, we're moving out of the "city", because I don't want you to get into any trouble at school or anything else. So, we moved to the outskirts, in Muhlenberg Township, back in August of 66, and wow, we got into more "trouble" than we ever did!!!  But, all in all, it was the experience of living "those" times, during "those" times, when things were so different. I guess it's hard to put into words for the younger crowd today.  I really don't want to sound like an "old" man, I guess because I'm still 18 "upstairs", but it's the truth.

Hepcat

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I know there are probably already several threads around here where we've discussed our personal genesises as Monsterkids.

The problem being that those other threads are so old that they're very deeply buried. And I can't think of any effective search words to unearth them.

This was about the time that I was first seeing the Uni classics, on late Saturday nights by way of Toledo's INFINITY and FT. Wayne's PSYCHO CINEMA.

You lived in northwestern Ohio then I presume.

 ???
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Wich2

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>You lived in northwestern Ohio then I presume.<

Hep, as Ed McMahon might have said,

"You are CORRECT, sir - In your triangulation!"

Skully, I treasure my kidhood, which sounds a lot like yours. But I know from talking to younger folks, that there were treasures after our era, too! As there were before us - DANDELION WINE being a great example.

Best,
-Craig