Author Topic: How much are you willing to spend?  (Read 2558 times)

Hepcat

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #15 on: March 20, 2017, 07:58:20 AM »
Like how I'm going to survive when I'm too old to work and I have no money to retire.

I don't understand the concept of "too old to work". I plant to continue working into my eighties. That has the potential of alleviating/easing the kind of financial problems to which you're referring.

Moreover men have a tendency to derive their sense of worth from their jobs. As a result, I've seen too many men decline very rapidly in vigour after they retire. I wish to avoid that.

 cl:)
Collecting! It's what I do!

skully

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #16 on: March 20, 2017, 11:27:54 AM »
Hepcat, you are correct. Although I wouldn't agree with working into your 80"s,  unless that is your true desire.  However, having sense of worth from a job is "spot on",  unless you can't stand what you do working.  There are many financial avenues to save money for later on.  Even Wal-Mart employees have access to a 401k. 

Wich2

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2017, 11:43:55 AM »
"Work" is a very broad word, in this sense...

I absolutely respect a person saying, "I've done this task for decades. It is enough."

What I can't understand, is folks who do that - and six months later are bored, and/or one year later die from lack of purpose.

It's a BIG world we live in, with plenty to do. For yourself - and for others.

-Craig

P.S. - And for the record, this is one of the wiser statements ever posted here: "Mr. Grail, you can just take your little hotsy totsy plastic rear end and your rubber head and go find someone else to pay your rent. I'm not having it."

Hepcat

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #18 on: March 20, 2017, 11:50:42 AM »
I know a fellow from another board who retired from what was I believe an office job at the age of 65. Not satisfied with being simply a retiree for whatever reason, he took a job as a supermarket stock boy. He'd had a tendency to carry extra weight his whole life. Well no longer. The job as a stock boy trimmed him down and now he's both healthier and wealthier!

Delivering flyers, dog walking, any job that keeps you walking after the age of 65 will extend your life (as well as earn cash for collectibles and the odd steak dinner).

 ;)
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 11:59:58 AM by Hepcat »
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Hepcat

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2017, 11:59:21 AM »
P.S. - And for the record, this is one of the wiser statements ever posted here: "Mr. Grail, you can just take your little hotsy totsy plastic rear end and your rubber head and go find someone else to pay your rent. I'm not having it."

You label a statement that strikes me as arising out of bitterness as among the wisest ever made on this board?

 :o

Okay, okay, so you're not into collectibles because we can't take them with us when we die. What would you propose instead, spending all our money on the truly ephemeral, e.g. booze, drugs and cigarettes, just to make sure we outlast whatever we buy?

 ???
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 01:35:01 PM by Hepcat »
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skully

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2017, 12:56:45 PM »
Wich2, I again have to agree with Hepcat here.  We all, by now, should know(those of us who are a bit older), that it's just common sense to keep active in later years.  There have been enough studies reported of the benefits of staying active later on, and the possible downside if not.  As for me, going to the local gym and pumping iron is my main way.  And again, as to that statement from raycastile, everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but, that's not mine.  If you are angry about collecting what you like, or are upset with prices for these items when they turn up for sale or bid, when you want the item and you know there's no way to obtain it, it's just human nature to get upset, I guess, because you really want that particular item.  To be bitter, in my opinion, is not a healthy attitude.

Wich2

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2017, 01:11:31 PM »
If you read Ray's comment in context, he speaks of a change in perspective over time. I don't read his comment as "bitter,' but as, "knowing."

I've NEVER spoken against collecting as collecting (he says, in a room containing vinyl records, mego figures, and comic books.) I HAVE often been one of several folks speaking for the perspective that Ray describes.

-Craig

skully

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2017, 01:19:38 PM »
Wich2,  you read it as knowing, I read it as being very angry with the current market for these things. In the "realm" of collecting anything, well then, what's the sense then??  Just what kind of perspective are you talking about? 

Hepcat

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2017, 02:25:27 PM »
I don't like the current market for many collectibles either. I also recognize that sooner or later I may have to content myself  with only what I have.

Nonetheless I sincerely hope I never lose the joy of collecting, i.e  the longing for my holy grails, the sense of wonder and even magic with which all my collectibles are imbued even the easily found. It will be a sad day indeed when I cease taking delight, comfort and satisfaction in my collections.

« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 05:12:20 PM by Hepcat »
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skully

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #24 on: March 20, 2017, 06:06:02 PM »
Hepcat, with the way that you post all of those great pictures of your collection and of others, I doubt very much that you will ever loose your joy of collecting!  It is like what I previously said, I enjoy the thrill of the hunt.  Ray had mentioned "where were you 20 years ago",  I guess I sort of take that as,  where were these sellers of these rarities back then when I could have afforded it better, or, maybe the prices of these rarities wouldn't have been so dramatic then.  The probable irony here is them, like us, were also collecting 20 years ago. We found what we found THEN, and we bought what we bought THEN.  One must realize that some of these so called "grails" are really hard to come by, then, and now. The current market for WHATEVER collectible is what the market will bear of course.  Something scarce or rare will usually bring about a premium price when it is offered. Is there "fault" to be blamed here??  Of course not.  Unless, that is, if you don't like the fact that someone is willing to buy something that is really scarce and actually buy it.  You know, when I was involved with coin collecting many years ago, and I would go to coin shows, I actually thought that I'd "seen it all" with "human emotion" at some of these shows, but I tell you what, it isn't anything like I saw at some toy shows already.  It's just the same old, same old.  Either get over it, or, move on.

horrorhunter

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #25 on: March 20, 2017, 06:36:27 PM »
I love my collection and I'm probably as aggressive as most folks trying to obtain certain pieces, though I don't have the disposable cash that many collectors do. That said, I've gradually been approaching this whole thing from a different viewpoint. More and more I've been stepping outside myself and enjoying certain desirable collectibles simply because they exist...whether I own them or not. I'll hang on to my stuff as long as possible, but I love to look at pics of other people's collections on the internet and in books, and I love to read their collecting stories and experience their love of collecting. I realize I'll never have everything I want but I can still appreciate things I don't have through others. UMA is good for that. Overall it's a WE thing more than a ME thing. That stuff exists and I can enjoy it even if it isn't in my home to touch and look at in person. After a certain point too many possessions can be a burden anyway. It's really our love of the stuff and the memories that's the most important anyway, even more so than the stuff.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 10:28:51 PM by horrorhunter »
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Wolfman

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #26 on: March 20, 2017, 08:21:04 PM »
I'm planning to retire at the end of 2018. I'll be 62 by then, and will have a pension & social security. Yes, I'm taking my S.S. right away. Despite what some so-called  financial experts advise, there is no right or wrong on when to take it. I want my $ right away. As far as people who don't know what to do with themselves once they retire, that won't be a problem for me. I've been playing tennis for 43 years, and don't plan on stopping anytime soon. I also like to run and go to the gym. Too many people complain that they wish they had more time to do the things they love, but work won't allow them to. Then they retire, and waste away, because they've been programmed to work their whole lives. It's going to be like a never ending weekend. What's the downside?  Some people are just plain boring imo. If you have health issues, that's one thing. If not, get out there and enjoy life!

JP

Creepy

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2017, 08:51:49 PM »
In the past I spent heavily (probably too heavily) on my hobbies. The problem was that I was a very unfocused collector. I collected movie posters, screen-used props, replica props, masks, DVDs, and books, among other things. The issue was that I was constantly selling parts of my collection to buy the next thing and never really enjoyed my collection.

9 years ago I remarried (I was a widow) and my wife really didn't care for most of what I collected, and in the interest of marital bliss, I sold off everything.

My wife is now (recently) my ex-wife and I am in the process of collecting again. I never lost my passion. I did grow a bit wiser in the last 9 yrs and have decided to focus on vintage Movie Posters, certain Production art (weirdly enough, I only collect blasters, rayguns, etc... concept drawings), masks, autographs, and DVDs. I have a budget of around $300/month and will build slowly, focusing on quality, not quantity. 

The Batman

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2017, 10:01:29 PM »
If it is something that brings more happiness than the amount of money it costs, I would get it.

But I know spending any major chunk of cash makes retired life a bit different.

'Hope to remain in CA even for retirement.
'Comforting to know we could just get a cheap house in another State and have a better retirement.

Some people sell their house, put tons of stuff in storage, live out of a large RV and travel through all of America they want to see for a year or two. A temporary life for a while, then back to buying a small home somewhere to retire. Because life on the road when you are VERY old would be rough.

The Batman

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Re: How much are you willing to spend?
« Reply #29 on: March 20, 2017, 11:20:52 PM »
I know a fellow from another board who retired from what was I believe an office job at the age of 65. Not satisfied with being simply a retiree for whatever reason, he took a job as a supermarket stock boy. He'd had a tendency to carry extra weight his whole life. Well no longer. The job as a stock boy trimmed him down and now he's both healthier and wealthier!

Delivering flyers, dog walking, any job that keeps you walking after the age of 65 will extend your life (as well as earn cash for collectibles and the odd steak dinner).

 ;)


Yes, I believe walking a lot daily can extend retired life. My Dad walked his dog for an hour after each meal, which is 3 hours of walking per day. It has been said we should walk 30 minutes per day. So walking 3 hrs per day must be much better for us all.