Author Topic: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting  (Read 4025 times)

roheimiana

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New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« on: January 03, 2009, 12:51:41 PM »
Here’s something that might seem like science fiction but is very real and (for better or worse) worth thinking about:

2009 will see the first release for home use of Additive Fabrication Machines, aka “3D Printers”. These are devices which can create exact replicas of any object that has been scanned into a computer. The replicas are made by reproducing the object layer by layer (e.g. by building up 2D slices about the thickness of a hair) until it is complete, using an “ink” which can be hardened into rigid or flexible plastic as well as other materials.

Such technology has been in industrial use for several decades (especially for creating prototypes from computer designs) but it has been prohibitively expensive, with larger AFMs costing more than a million dollars. This year, however, a company called Desktop Factory will introduce a compact version for home and small-business use. The device is about the size of a microwave oven, can replicate objects up to 5 inches square, and will initially sell for $5000. It's widely predicted, though, that the price will be down to $1000 within two to three years. Here’s what the 3D printer looks like:



And here’s a link to the manufacturer’s website:

http://www.desktopfactory.com/our_product/


Now I expect that the implications for toy collecting should be obvious. We’ve already had a lot of fun here reproducing the cardboard boxes that toys come in but now we will actually be able to reproduce the toys themselves.

Thus I can imagine, say by 2012, the following ad by “poseablemonster” appearing in the UMA CLASSIFIED section

SUPERSALE ON TOY REPLICAS!

Every toy pictured in my Flickr Monster Gallery is now 50% off!
For example, anything up to 8” in size is $25 rather than $50!
Also, I have a new ink which will print as soft rubber
so please have a close look at the jigglers this time!

I can also anticipate my enthusiastic response :

“Hey, Andy, please make me two AHI Creatures, a set pencil-sharpeners, and the backseat passengers for the Renzi monstermobile. BTW, did you get the scan of the Frankie water gun from Roebuck yet? If so, please make me four of them too! Thanks, Chris.”

Strange as this scenario must seem, it’s certainly worth thinking about. Personally, I am inclined to remember Marshall McLuhan’s observation that “paying attention to new technologies doesn’t necessarily mean you have to like them”….



« Last Edit: January 03, 2009, 01:29:45 PM by roheimiana »

raycastile

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2009, 02:52:39 PM »
We're inching closer to a home "replicator."  But unlike the Star Trek devices, these will probably never reproduce anything more than a surface facsimile of the original object.  It won't be made of the same material, won't have the same feel and texture, and probably won't have the same articulation or moving parts.  So it will be a nice "statue" representation of the original, sort of like a resin repro.  But yes, I do believe Andy will be making extra $$$ churning out dozens of copies of his big Alton Rubber Frankenstein.
Raymond Castile

Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2009, 06:42:28 PM »
I think any toy could be replicated right now if money were no object. Name a monster item that couldn't be remade ~with an original for a pattern~ and unlimited funds

If we get to the time where anything can be reproduced cheaply in a home replicator, why monster toys? Why not rare coins, gold bars, or something that has more value. I'm not convinced that monster toys would have much value to anyone (in this "replicant" future) other than as a curiosity.

Being able to have any collectible made through replication would take much of the fun out of collecting. Trying to place a value on a piece would be near impossible. I can imagine a future frantic owner fretting over whether the Pez dispenser Wolf Man he has is an original...or a 'hot out of the oven' replication ("now let's see...is this thing worth the price of a box of salt... or a 10 pound slab of bacon?")   

I agree with Ray. We are a very long way from inexpensive  any-monster-toy-replication. I won't be alive to see this happen. If it does, it won't concern me.

Any collectible can be replicated now for the right $$$$$$$$$$....but cheaply and fool all the experts? Good science-fiction  :)
Just my two-cents.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2009, 06:52:04 PM by Richard »

Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2009, 06:50:23 PM »
...But yes, I do believe Andy will be making extra $$$ churning out dozens of copies of his big Alton Rubber Frankenstein.


 :o Holy-smokes, Ray, you're right!  :o

My kitty, Puddy Tat, cashed in his cat food coupons for some spendin' money. He just got one of these pieces... and is gettin' ready to chew it to pieces!
Quick, Andy, replicate another one!!!  ;)


Mike Scott

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2009, 06:55:41 PM »
If we get to the time where anything can be reproduced cheaply . . . Why not gold bars,

I don't think you'll be able to make gold cheaply, since you'd have to load gold in the front end in order to have gold come out the back end.
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Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2009, 08:16:53 PM »
I don't think you'll be able to make gold cheaply, since you'd have to load gold in the front end in order to have gold come out the back end.

Very true, Mike, my friend. You are right, of course. I suppose I was trying to say it this way~

[a future 'collector" to a friend, proudly pointing to his shelf] ~ "That's what an original honest-to-goodness AHI Creature toy figure looks like. Just like that! And that over there...that's what a real honest-to-goodness gold bar looks like. Looks just like that!"

I guess I was thinking about what implications this type of wonderous machine would have to my collection and collecting for me in general, if it came to be. That seemed to be the theme of this thread. And I see none as I don't think I'll be around to see this happen.

Anything can be replicated now. Some things would be much more difficult than others. If an inexpensive home replictor comes to be, the product will still be a replication. Perhaps it will be a perfect replication. As if it came off the assembly line with an original. So then, what's vintage and what's not? How will one tell? And will anyone care? BTW, this miracle machine probably has a thousand and one better uses than duplicating collectibles, IMHO.

I was lucky enough to have kept many of my monster toys from the 60s and 70s and they have an extra special meaning to me (how I got them, when I got them, why I got them, etc). I wouldn't replace them if I lost them (and I eventually will, I guarantee it). Others may not care as I do (especially in the future) about my original things -they won't have the memmories I have. That's perfectly OK. And, there is no reason a copy can't have it's own special meaning to someone (who wants to own it, to look at it and hold it).  I have a few copies of original items too :D


ps. I need a rear view door mirror for my '57 Chev Barbie car. Needn't be vintage, I would take a replicant if available.

toysoldierman2001

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2009, 08:38:31 PM »
Is that 57 Chevy Barbie car a convertable by any chance? My Daughter has a lot of Barbie cars in our basement and she no longer wants them being she 23yrs old now and out on her own.If it is I'll gladly let you have the mirror ;D

ChattyLMS

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2009, 09:35:58 PM »
Quote
But unlike the Star Trek devices, these will probably never reproduce anything more than a surface facsimile of the original object.[/quote]

At first I thought you must be kidding.  But yes there are machines that do that.  They are usedin medical technology, too.  But the toy would not be an actual replication.  Like the arms wouldn't move.  Maybe that'll be in the future?

Sometimes you can find parts for Barbie cars on ebay.  We have a beautiful gold Barbie Corvette that my husband used in a mock-up for work.  I wonder where it is?  It was a cool/cute mock up.
Laura ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)

Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2009, 09:51:17 PM »
Is that 57 Chevy Barbie car a convertable by any chance? My Daughter has a lot of Barbie cars in our basement and she no longer wants them being she 23yrs old now and out on her own.If it is I'll gladly let you have the mirror ;D

That's the car! It has a removable driver side door rear view mirror that I am missing. I'll try to post a pic of the car if I can (it's on display in my back garage and there is a ton of snow to wade through). I would be happy to send you something for it. What do you need in monster toys,buttons,magazines,cards,comics,etc? PM me, please. I will find something for you in trade.
Best,
Richard

Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2009, 10:32:11 PM »
Is that 57 Chevy Barbie car a convertable by any chance? My Daughter has a lot of Barbie cars in our basement and she no longer wants them being she 23yrs old now and out on her own.If it is I'll gladly let you have the mirror ;D


I ran outside to the back garage and got a pic of the car and the mirror attachment area(where it's missing).
Thank you, again!
Best,
Richard



ChattyLMS

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2009, 01:17:42 AM »
What a cool car!  And so is the A&W glass!
Laura ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)

Jscareshock

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2009, 11:25:35 AM »
Ah a replicator.  That way i could borrow someone else's toys and make temporary copies until i can afford the real thing.  Or maybe I could make copies and play with them so that my originals don't get damaged--loo out Colorforms Spacemen!!

Monster Bob

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2009, 12:44:57 PM »


I want a machine that will replicate girls...hubba hubba.  That would be worth more than gold (or monster toys) ...!   ;D

Richard

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2009, 12:26:50 AM »

I want a machine that will replicate girls...hubba hubba.  That would be worth more than gold (or monster toys) ...!   ;D

Sounds like a plan, Monster Bob!
That would be Dr. Goldfoot that we should be talkin' to, right?  ;) ;D

fmofmpls

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Re: New Technology and the Future of Toy Collecting
« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2009, 12:36:53 PM »
I want a machine that will replicate girls...hubba hubba. 

Isn't that what they call the internet?  ;D
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