Universal Monster Army

Chitter Chatter => General Discussion => Topic started by: Monsters For Sale on June 14, 2020, 11:11:58 PM

Title: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 14, 2020, 11:11:58 PM
Things today are different from when I was a kid.

Saw this quote on the Interwebnet:

       “The average age of Major League Baseball fans is 57.  That’s up from 50 in 2000.”


Sounds to me like a sport on the way out. 

Never would have thought it could happen when I was a kid in the 1950’s.  In school, the World Series games were on the radio and the kiss-butt Hallway Monitor would tell the teachers the score as she moved from class to class, collecting attendance for the main office.

Then the teacher would announce it to the class before she could continue.


Some things is just differ'nt than they used-to-was.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Mike Scott on June 15, 2020, 12:49:17 AM
Things today are different from when I was a kid.

We have indoor plumbing, now!  ;D
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 15, 2020, 01:16:17 AM
We have indoor plumbing, now!  ;D 

Sure, you fancy people - with your shoes.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 15, 2020, 01:20:21 AM
Back when cartoons ruled, cereal was a meal, and the outdoors were for hide-n-seek.  I long for those simpler days.  I hate adulting, lol.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Mike...In 3-D! on June 15, 2020, 07:58:12 AM
I hope baseball sticks around. Unfortunately due to it's lack of "action" I think it's very much a sport where you have to have been raised on it to be into it. For me, it doesn't feel like summer unless there's baseball being played. I'm hoping we can get a shortened season but I'm not too optimistic about it.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 15, 2020, 08:02:21 AM
I hope baseball sticks around.

I don't care for baseball on tv, but love it live.  The last few years me and the old man have been going to a few Cleveland Indians games over the summer.  We even purchased Corey Snyder jerseys for this season.  I hope we get to catch at least one game this year.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Mike...In 3-D! on June 15, 2020, 08:04:36 AM
I don't care for baseball on tv, but love it live.  The last few years me and the old man have been going to a few Cleveland Indians games over the summer.  We even purchased Corey Snyder jerseys for this season.  I hope we get to catch at least one game this year.

TV is actually my least preferred method of taking it in. 1st is live, 2nd is radio and 3rd is TV. Something about being in the backyard and working on something while listening to the game tickles my nostalgia bone.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 15, 2020, 08:07:34 AM
TV is actually my least preferred method of taking it in. 1st is live, 2nd is radio and 3rd is TV. Something about being in the backyard and working on something while listening to the game tickles my nostalgia bone.

I agree.  I love listening to it on the radio at work while driving around or at home while doing chores.  The only time I'll watch on tv is at night while I'm sorting comics or doing a model kit.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: fearliath on June 15, 2020, 11:07:42 AM
Even in the 80’s and early 90’s baseball ruled (at least in my world). Everyone I knew played baseball. Everyone I knew collected baseball cards. A few kids played basketball, football and soccer but EVERYONE played baseball.

The only time in my life I have ever been star struck was my first visit to Yankee Stadium in 1991. Don Mattingly (my hero at the time) walked by and I couldn’t even move. He hit a homer in that game.

Then the 1994 strike happened and MLB hurt itself more than they could have ever imagined. I (as a Yankees fan) was devastated. People lost interest to degrees before that but that really hurt them.

This year they had a legitimate chance to be the only game in town. Baseball lends itself to social distancing better than almost any team sport. Instead they’re fighting over money again and sinking into irrelevance.

That being said, baseball is still my favorite sport by far.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Hepcat on June 16, 2020, 09:21:14 PM
Something about being in the backyard and working on something while listening to the game tickles my nostalgia bone.

I agree.  I love listening to it on the radio at work while driving around or at home while doing chores.

Me too! I love listening to baseball on the radio.

The only time I'll watch on tv is at night while I'm sorting comics or doing a model kit.

Would not those be ideal times for listening to baseball on the radio?

 ???
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 16, 2020, 09:42:20 PM
If you want to make this all about baseball, that's OK with me.

I was kinda hoping members would contribute examples of other changes today that they never would have predicted when they were younger.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Hepcat on June 17, 2020, 09:44:57 AM
Alright. I agree. Times have indeed changed enormously over all. Here's a little vignette on the subject I ran across on the net a few years ago:

In the line at the store, the cashier told the older woman that plastic
bags weren't good for the environment. The woman apologized to her and
explained, "We didn't have the green thing back in my day."

That's right, they didn't have the green thing in her day. Back then,
they returned their milk bottles, Coke bottles and beer bottles to the
store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized
and refilled, using the same bottles over and over. So they really were
recycled. But they didn't have the green thing back her day.

In her day, they walked up stairs, because they didn't have an escalator
in every store and office building. They walked to the grocery store and
didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time they had to go two
blocks. But she's right. They didn't have the green thing in her day.

Back then, they washed the baby's diapers because they didn't have the
throw-away kind. They dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
machine burning up 220 volts "wind and solar power" really did dry the
clothes. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters,
not always brand-new clothing. But that old lady is right, they didn't
have the green thing back in her day.

Back then, they had one TV, or radio, in the house not a TV in every
room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a pizza dish, not a
screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, they blended
and stirred by hand because they didn't have electric machines to do
everything for you. When they packaged a fragile item to send in the
mail, they used wadded up newspaper to cushion it, not styrofoam or
plastic bubble wrap.

Back then, they didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut
the lawn. They used a push mower that ran on human power. They exercised
by working so they didn't need to go to a health club to run on
treadmills that operate on electricity. But she's right, they didn't
have the green thing back then.

They drank from a fountain when they were thirsty, instead of using a
cup or a plastic bottle every time they had a drink of water. They
refilled pens with ink, instead of buying a new pen, and they replaced
the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor
just because the blade got dull. But they didn't have the green thing back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar and kids rode their bikes to school
or rode the school bus, instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour
taxi service. They had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire
bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And they didn't need a computerized
gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000 miles out in
space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

But that old lady is right. They didn't have the green thing back in her
day.


 ;)
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 17, 2020, 11:05:39 AM

I think today's big TV's use less electricity than the little ones with numerous, hot tubes.

But, yeah sun-drying clothes outside on a line automatically bleached your whites.  No need for chemicals.

In my neighborhood, most families had only one used car - and that one was usually utilized until you HAD to buy another, less-used car. 

The idea of buying water in a bottle sounded as silly as buying bags of air.

We had a garden and grew our strawberries.  They were smaller than what's in stores today, but much sweeter. 

The tomatoes we grew had much more flavor.  It was not uncommon to take a salt shaker with you into the garden and pull them straight from the vine, and eat them, still warm from the sun.  People today who have never grown their own have no idea how good a tomato can taste.

It was a rare toy that needed a battery.  It must have been 30 years ago that I gave a small boy a stuffed character.  He put it on the floor in front of him, looked over at me, and asked, "What does it do?"  He wanted to push a button and have it entertain him.  I still remember how sad I felt for him and his generation.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Mike...In 3-D! on June 17, 2020, 12:16:33 PM
If you want to make this all about baseball, that's OK with me.

I was kinda hoping members would contribute examples of other changes today that they never would have predicted when they were younger.

The craziest one for me is the internet. Talking to younger folks who never knew a time without it cracks me up. Everything was different. You had to have your finger on the pulse and have various outlets to get your information depending on what it was you needed. Some I get nostalgic over (going to the video store and renting a movie based solely on the awesome cover) and others, not so much (picking a band name out of the "thank you" section of a CD booklet and gambling $15 on an album).

If you would have told me in middle school that I would have a device in my pocket that would allow me to watch movies, listen to music and find the answer to damn near any question I had I would have thought you were a total nutcase.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Anton Phibes on June 17, 2020, 01:13:26 PM
I'll never forget the day I walked into a video store, and discovered a vhs of Return of the Vampire.  7th Heaven. The internet, while supplying a lot of coolness, has destroyed the element of surprise.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 17, 2020, 09:42:40 PM
One change is the closing of VHS/DVD stores due to the vast amounts of streaming services.  I used to love going to the mom and pop movie stores on a Friday night.  A few movies, some candy, and maybe a comic book or two.  A good friend of mine used to own a video store in the 80's to early 90's.  I have a good majority of his products that he saved from when the store closed. 
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 17, 2020, 09:55:11 PM
One change is the closing of VHS/DVD stores due to the vast amounts of streaming services.  I used to love going to the mom and pop movie stores on a Friday night.  A few movies, some candy, and maybe a comic book or two.  A good friend of mine used to own a video store in the 80's to early 90's.  I have a good majority of his products that he saved from when the store closed. 

Was that the reason?  Or was it largely the fact that online sellers could sell movies so much cheaper than brick and mortar stores?

Yeah.  I loved browsing the packed shelves of Suncoast Video.  They specialized is stocking all the lesser-known movies that other stores didn't bother carrying.  They got a LOT of my money.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 17, 2020, 10:05:00 PM
Was that the reason?  Or was it largely the fact that online sellers could sell movies so much cheaper than brick and mortar stores?

Yeah.  I loved browsing the packed shelves of Suncoast Video.  They specialized is stocking all the lesser-known movies that other stores didn't bother carrying.  They got a LOT of my money.

He had to close mainly because Blockbuster, Family Video, and other larger stores took over.  I believe he closed up about 1993-94, so way before movies hit the internet. 

I used to love Suncoast.  I could always find hard-to-find videos and toys.  Really suck when they closed.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Hepcat on June 17, 2020, 11:47:57 PM
Suspect Video on Markham Street in Toronto was very similar but it too closed in January 2017:

(https://exclaim.ca/images/suspectvideo.jpg)

 :(
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: marsattacks666 on June 21, 2020, 05:53:22 PM
Things today are different from when I was a kid.

Saw this quote on the Interwebnet:

       “The average age of Major League Baseball fans is 57.  That’s up from 50 in 2000.”


Sounds to me like a sport on the way out. 

Never would have thought it could happen when I was a kid in the 1950’s.  In school, the World Series games were on the radio and the kiss-butt Hallway Monitor would tell the teachers the score as she moved from class to class, collecting attendance for the main office.

Then the teacher would announce it to the class before she could continue.


Some things is just differ'nt than they used-to-was.

Personally,  I am not a fan of Sports and I am in my early fifties.  However. Most of my friends who average different ages, all of them watch Sports. In fact. Where I use to live  the Demographic is 20'ish through late 60s. Las Vegas is definitely a Sports fan(atic)s' State. Almost every Casino has a Sportsbook, for betting.
It got to the point for me, I loathed working in a Casino.

Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 22, 2020, 04:43:46 PM
Personally,  I am not a fan of Sports and I am in my early fifties.  However. Most of my friends who average different ages, all of them watch Sports. In fact. Where I use to live  the Demographic is 20'ish through late 60s. Las Vegas is definitely a Sports fan(atic)s' State. Almost every Casino has a Sportsbook, for betting.
It got to the point for me, I loathed working in a Casino.

I used to be a sports fanatic about 15 years ago.  Then I started getting pissed at the players going on strike because they wanted millions more.  About five year ago I started watching the Cleveland Browns and Indians again, which I enjoyed.  However, politics and social issues began to rear its ugly head into the arena of sports, something that is supposed to be a form of escapism.  So this year, with all these players virtue signaling, and wanting to be political and social heads during the game, I think I'm out.  My time would be better spent watching a horror movie or reading.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Hepcat on June 22, 2020, 10:39:51 PM
Yes, times have certainly changed. I/we did all kinds of things when I was a kid in elementary school from 1958-65 that I never see kids doing today:

* As soon as kindergarten walking the several blocks to school unaccompanied by any parent/adult.

* Just leaving the house in the morning to go out and play with friends, whether it was baseball, football or whatever activity in the park or hide-and-go-seek or any other game right on the street. Sometimes we'd ride our bikes as much as a mile away to a particular park or street. The key though was that there was no need to report to parents, so long as we were home by the time it got dark.

* Doing wheelies on my bike. That's something rarely seen these days. Whether wheelies are no longer fashionable or whether kids don't get the chamce to pop any wheelies under the ever present gaze of helicopter parents is a question I can't answer.

* Going out for little league football without the parents knowing anything about it. I mean why would they care?

* Being given bus fare and taking the bus downtown by myself for French, Lithuanian or accordion classes. The latter of course required lugging a full size accordion downtown.

* Reaching into ice water coolers in variety stores to select soda pop in dripping wet proper ten ounce refillable glass bottles. 

* Roaming streets looking for empty pop bottles for the two cent deposit. I needed the money for cards, comics and potato chips because I was always collecting something.

* Looking through the spinner rack at corner variety and drug stores to select ten and then twelve cent (eeeeek!) comic books. Specialty comic shops weren't even imaginable, let alone comic books fetching even $1.00.

* Flinging baseball cards up against brick walls in winner take all games with nary a thought as to future "values".

* Having an early morning or after school paper route. Selling stuff, e.g. newspapers, seeds, Xmas cards, door-to-door.

* Being sent to the store to buy cigarettes for my parents, or six bottles of pop for the family.

* Hitting up my parents for dimes and quarters to buy firecrackers before Firecracker(Victoria) Day. I mean what's wrong with young boys letting off firecrackers? Playing with caps all year round.

* Playing with marbles, Yo-Yos and Duncan Spin Tops. Sidewalks would often be taken up by young girls skipping rope. When was the last time any of us saw any little girls engaged in this splendid aerobic activity?

* Building model kits and slot cars. Racing these slot cars at the hobby shop track downtown. Kids don't build models anymore. Kids these days aren't interested in anything that doesn't provide instant gratification, i.e. anything not TV screen related.  Just check out the clientele of the few remaining hobby shops. They're all aging boomers.

* Playing with pea shooters. My parents giving me a BB gun and a bow and arrow with a steel point.

* Carrying a jack knife around for games such as knife baseball.

* Hitting up my parents for a dime to go to the skating rink or swimming pool with friends. No parents to supervise of course. Pools had lifeguards. What more did you need?

* Hitting up parents for the twenty cents to go to the Saturday afternoon kids' matinees with two movies and cartoons or Three Stooges shorts at the neighbourhood theatre

* Going for a dip in the creek behind the house which my father had dammed up to form a swimming hole.

* Camping out in a tent overnight with friends in the backyard.

* Climbing trees.

Oh, I'm sure modern parents would all be aghast. They want the kids safe in front of the TV with video game consoles at all times. And that's why so many kids are obese and end up with deadly peanut and bee sting allergies. Keep kids squeaky clean and of course they don't develop their natural immunities.

Deny kids deadly pea shooters and (heaven forbid!) metal lunch boxes and they end up arming themselves with real knives and even guns to go to school. It's the principle of the dam. Keep denying kids whatever is "unsafe" and the pressure just keeps building up and building up till it explodes.

The ultimate irony of course is the parents who demonize sugar (of course their inactive kids don't need the extra calories). These kids then take to experimenting with alcohol, pot, crystal meth and cocaine at first opportunity. It's the boy who cried wolf syndrome. "Hey, remember, you were the ones who told us sugar was so bad! You think we're going to listen to you now when you tell us to avoid booze and drugs? And what about all that Scotch and gin you drink and those sleeping pills and pain killers you pop all the time? Sure, sure, we kids are going to listen to you old farts. Yeah, right."

 ::)
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: geezer butler on June 23, 2020, 06:03:52 PM
I used to be a sports fanatic about 15 years ago.  Then I started getting pissed at the players going on strike because they wanted millions more.  About five year ago I started watching the Cleveland Browns and Indians again, which I enjoyed.  However, politics and social issues began to rear its ugly head into the arena of sports, something that is supposed to be a form of escapism.  So this year, with all these players virtue signaling, and wanting to be political and social heads during the game, I think I'm out.  My time would be better spent watching a horror movie or reading.

This is interesting topic. I used to be big sports fan as well. As much as I loved my monsters and superheros, I loved collecting sports cards equally as much (especially baseball cards.) I was kind of a jock, in that I played sports when i was a kid, including baseball and football in high school. I used to play softball and hockey as an adult too. I was addicted to fantasy football for awhile, especially in my early to mid 20s.

Around my early to mid 30s, I started to lose interest. I stopped gambling on sports all together. No longer play any sports (or go to the gym for that matter), and that's actually a problem because now i'm turning into a fat ass, but I digress  :D. Gave away and sold most of my sports memorabilia. It wasn't political for me, I just started to realize how watching sports doesn't make me happy. When you have money on the line, you get real pissed off when the team (or players) you're betting on don't come through. And I would have anger management issues watching my favorite teams. I started to realize "why am I doing this?"

I can't remember last time I watched a college football or basketball game. Have no idea what's going on in the NBA, NHL, or Boxing. I admit, baseball and football were always my favorite sports, so I can't completely give them up. I follow the standings and still watch some games, but not as many as I used to. And even when I watch my fav teams, I don't know all the players like i used to.

Anyhow, last 10-15 yrs, I try to focus on things that bring me 100% happiness, like watching horror movies, listening to rock music,  and collecting. Never disappointed that way.
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 23, 2020, 07:41:38 PM
I posted this over at "The Last Non-Monster Movie You Watched" thread.  After, I read the latest here, I thought maybe it belonged here.


"I have never been a sports fan.  I have this one major flaw.  No matter how hard they tried, no one could ever get me to care who won.  I just don't give a damn, and I've never been able to understand why anyone else would.

Oddly, I do like the idea of old-time baseball.  The pastural setting, small town company teams battling for some stupid trophy.  I even like the general history of the game.

To that end, I own some movies about baseball that offer fun character studies of some of the game's more interesting players.

If you do like the sport, can't go to a game and want to watch some baseball-themed entertainment, try these:  (in no particular order)

Major League, 1989
Natural, The, 1984
Bull Durham, 1988
Field of Dreams, A, 1989
For Love of the Game, 1999
Bingo Long's Traveling All-Stars and Motor Kings, The, 1976
Rookie, The, 2002
Ken Burns' Baseball, 2009 - (Documentary) at least through the 1950's

I recently (last 10 days or so) watched three of the above.  That got me thinking about the "idealized" sport - you know, no strikes, no drug scandals and players that don't get several million dollars to sit out a season with injuries."
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 24, 2020, 12:55:10 AM
Not only has sports changed, but also how kids grow up.

When I was around 6 or 7 my grandmother, who babysat me during the day while my parents worked, was a great life teacher.  She taught me how to sew, wash clothes, dry clothes on a line outside, clean, cook, and proper manners.  At about 8 or 9 she taught me yard work and how to work with tools.  I also had to memorize the National Anthem. 

I cherished my times with her.  She was the only grandparent that was really around for me.  I had my time to be a kid, but I also enjoyed learning life skills when she taught me them.  I also learned how to cook from her.  We made my favorite at the time, and her specialty, breaded chicken! 

When I a kid up I was disciplined.  If I said a bad work, I had soap in my mouth.  Grandma was strict but fair.  Her and her brother also took me to the horse track and taught me how to bet on the races, lol.  It was fun, but a lesson in money. 

At home I was involved with all types of sports, taught more about yard and house work, and about academics.  Every night I had to read for 30 minutes.  This made a world of difference for me in school.  Now I read everyday.  I was taught more about manners and how to treat people.  My parents made sure I would be able to survive and that I k ew life wouldn’t be easy.

I see too many teens and young adults that do t know the basics about house and yard work, let alone manners.  It’s a shame that their parents and grandparents became part of these generations of coddling and trophies for everyone.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Hepcat on June 28, 2020, 12:11:27 AM
Around my early to mid 30s, I started to lose interest. I stopped gambling on sports all together. No longer play any sports (or go to the gym for that matter), and that's actually a problem because now i'm turning into a fat ass, but I digress  :D. Gave away and sold most of my sports memorabilia. It wasn't political for me, I just started to realize how watching sports doesn't make me happy. When you have money on the line, you get real pissed off when the team (or players) you're betting on don't come through. And I would have anger management issues watching my favorite teams. I started to realize "why am I doing this?"

I can't remember last time I watched a college football or basketball game. Have no idea what's going on in the NBA, NHL, or Boxing. I admit, baseball and football were always my favorite sports, so I can't completely give them up. I follow the standings and still watch some games, but not as many as I used to. And even when I watch my fav teams, I don't know all the players like i used to.

Being a hardcore Canadian sports fan, I strongly resent the interest that sports of, for and by Americans, e.g. the Toronto Blue Jays, the Toronto Raptors and the NFL, elicit here in Toronto. The American wannabeism of so many Torontonians rubs me the wrong way.

And of all the cancellations and sundry changes prompted by the pandemic, what I miss the most is the indefinite postponement of the CFL season. A very powerful contributing factor is that I've been participating in the TSN CFL Fantasy League for the last four seasons and this has acted to give me an active vested interest in almost every game played. Moreover I'm a very good Fantasy player. I finished at #23 out of 16,488 participants last year just one really good player pick in a single solitary week out of the top ten. So I was just itching to jump back into the fray this year with my ambition being to crack the top three. But it's not to be I guess.

 :(

Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: Monsters For Sale on June 28, 2020, 01:01:37 AM
Being a hardcore Canadian sports fan,     

Canada has sports?  First I've head about it.

Ice fishing and guys clobbering each other with crooked boards, I guess - no civilized competition requiring teamwork though, right?
Title: Re: Signs of the Times - They Are A-Changin'
Post by: BigShadow on June 28, 2020, 10:35:15 AM
Canada has sports?  First I've head about it.

Ice fishing and guys clobbering each other with crooked boards, I guess - no civilized competition requiring teamwork though, right?

I thought the only other Canadian sports were Curling and Beer Drinking.  and sometimes those two combined into one mega-sport.  :P