Universal Monster Army

Chitter Chatter => General Discussion => Topic started by: Illoman on August 02, 2012, 03:32:13 PM

Title: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 02, 2012, 03:32:13 PM
I found this photo today while cleaning up my studio. It was taken circa 1978-79. I was taking a photography class in college and we had to do an "environmental piece", showing someone in their environment. The bookstore to the left in this photo is where I got the majority of my Famous Monsters and Castle of Frankensteins fresh off the news stand. It was located in a strip mall in north Dayton, right in front of the apartment complex where my Grandma lived. We would drive across town to see her, and it was my one shot at getting a monster mag. For whatever reason the drug stores where we lived didn't carry monster mags. So it was a good thing to go see Grandma. I enjoyed seeing her and enjoyed getting a new issue of FM. I had to have a bag when I purchased anything because if my folks saw it they would inevitably find it and throw it away. I rescued a few issues from the trash.

The shop itself was one of those stores just *crammed* to the walls with newspapers, paperbacks, magazines, maps, etc. There wasn't room for many customers all at once at any given time. Luckily whenever I went there they weren't busy. That store was very important to this monster kid, and I'm glad I took the photo when I did!

(http://i215.photobucket.com/albums/cc311/illoman/Bookstore.jpg)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 02, 2012, 03:59:53 PM
Oh man, Mike - that is so cool!  The place I went to in the 60's & early 70's for my monster mag fix was called Bob's Store.  It sounds exactly like the place you're talking about, except this was a seperate stone-wall building that sat by itself.  A Mom & Pop shop!  Has been long torn down since those days.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: general gruesome on August 02, 2012, 04:36:19 PM
wow that is awesome!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 02, 2012, 04:51:19 PM
Cool Mike! I bought my stuff at Mayos Drugs....and it's still there!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Street Worm on August 02, 2012, 05:11:58 PM
Nice! Man I wish I took more pictures.....................

I got all my comics, monster mags, Munster cards, little Rat Finks, Topps Flying Things....
you name it, at Jakes in New Britain, Ct.

This is how it looks now-  :(

(http://gallery.unrealspawnboard.com/albums/userpics/10006/jakes.png)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 02, 2012, 05:13:30 PM
The first place I bought monster mags at was Weisbrod's Pharmacy on the corner of Sanford & So. Orange Avenues in Newark. They carried the Warren mags, but not CoF. There was a deli two blocks closer to my house that carried The Monster Times. And there was a newsstand in Irvington that carried CoF that I only got to every so often, so my CoF collection was rather small. When Heroes World Comics Shop opened in Livingston Mall in the early '70s, I could get all my mags and comics from them! We used to go up there about twice a month, and they had a reserve service. That's when I started also getting Cinefantastique, Starlog, and Fangoria. Heroes World eventually moved out of the mall and nearer to Seton Hall University in So. Orange. They had to change their name during the whole Marvel/Diamond/Heroes World distribution debacle in the '90s.
I wish I had pix of some of those places, now.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 02, 2012, 05:17:42 PM
The first place I bought monster mags at was Weisbrod's Pharmacy on the corner of Sanford & So. Orange Avenues in Newark. They carried the Warren mags, but not CoF. There was a deli two blocks closer to my house that carried The Monster Times.

Count, you just jogged a memory for me: I also bought my Monster Times at that bookstore! I had forgotten until you brought it up. Man, I miss those days and those kinds of bookstores.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 02, 2012, 05:27:41 PM
Yeah, all the newsstands and such down here in NC sell nothing but porn anymore! In my town, the only place that has a decent magazine selection is Books-A-Million. The local comics shop closed a few years ago, and the local toy & hobby shop that carried Finescale Modeler closed in January.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on August 02, 2012, 06:57:25 PM
I enjoyed seeing her and enjoyed getting a new issue of FM. I had to have a bag when I purchased anything because if my folks saw it they would inevitably find it and throw it away. I rescued a few issues from the trash.

And all too frequent scenario in those days! Evry so often our parents need to be reminded of just how much cold, hard cash they threw away. Not that it's about the money of course. It's just necessary to use a frame of reference they can understand.

That store was very important to this monster kid, and I'm glad I took the photo when I did!

And so are we!

Most of the variety stores and newstands I patronized in the mid sixties carried the Warren magazines. I still distinctly remember the day though that I bought Creepy 1 with that great Jack Davis cover at the News Depot on Dundas Street near Wellington Street in downtown London.

 8)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 02, 2012, 07:16:05 PM
And all too frequent scenario in those days! Evry so often our parents need to be reminded of just how much cold, hard cash they threw away. Not that it's about the money of course. It's just necessary to use a frame of reference they can understand. 8)
Fortunately, I didn't have that problem. We had a finished basement and, after my half-brother moved out, his room became my playroom. So, I had a place to store my mags, build and display my kits, etc.
Unfortunately, several basement floods and an infestation of mice in the late '80s meant that a lot of those mags and comics were ruined. The mice also chewed and knocked over a lot of my kits. After they ruined a Salem Witch kit that I paid $25 for in '87, I turned my attention to gleefully murdering the little S.O.B.'s with glue-traps! (Couldn't put down regular traps or poisons, because of our dog and cat.)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 03, 2012, 03:50:09 PM
Nice! Man I wish I took more pictures.....................

I got all my comics, monster mags, Munster cards, little Rat Finks, Topps Flying Things....
you name it, at Jakes in New Britain, Ct.

This is how it looks now-  :(

([url]http://gallery.unrealspawnboard.com/albums/userpics/10006/jakes.png[/url])


Ugh...........that's like a punch in the gut brother.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 03, 2012, 03:52:50 PM
Fortunately, I didn't have that problem. We had a finished basement and, after my half-brother moved out, his room became my playroom. So, I had a place to store my mags, build and display my kits, etc.
Unfortunately, several basement floods and an infestation of mice in the late '80s meant that a lot of those mags and comics were ruined. The mice also chewed and knocked over a lot of my kits. After they ruined a Salem Witch kit that I paid $25 for in '87, I turned my attention to gleefully murdering the little S.O.B.'s with glue-traps! (Couldn't put down regular traps or poisons, because of our dog and cat.)


Revenge is a dish best served sticky.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 03, 2012, 05:01:10 PM
And all too frequent scenario in those days! Evry so often our parents need to be reminded of just how much cold, hard cash they threw away. Not that it's about the money of course. It's just necessary to use a frame of reference they can understand.

 8)

All I know is my folks had no malicious intent. They really thought they were protecting me somehow by limiting my exposure to horror themed stuff. They supported my monster habit as I got older. I remember one time I had bought Harry Nilsson's album Nilsson Schmilsson. It had that cool cover with Harry in his Dracula cape from his film Son of Dracula. I almost had a heart attack as I was blasting the album and his song "You're Breaking My Heart" came on! LOL!!! I knew if my mom didn't like me reading monster mags she certainly was not going to like me listening to that song!  ;D
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 03, 2012, 05:08:42 PM
This is how it looks now-  :(

([url]http://gallery.unrealspawnboard.com/albums/userpics/10006/jakes.png[/url])

Awful. Just before we left Newark, the deli where I used to get TMT at had been vacant since the mid-'80s. In the mid-'90s it reopened as a hair salon. Yeah, Newark really needed another one of those. Zombie Roll Eyes
As far as I know, Weisbrod's is still around.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 03, 2012, 05:52:00 PM
The 7-11 that I used to ride my bike to to get comics and Marvel Slurpee cups shut down a while back, and reopened as a Hostess outlet store. Now it's an abandoned building. Sigh...
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 03, 2012, 07:00:46 PM
The 7-11 that I used to ride my bike to to get comics and Marvel Slurpee cups shut down a while back, and reopened as a Hostess outlet store. Now it's an abandoned building. Sigh...

Used to ride my bike to the local 7-11 too. Great times, great Slurpees, great commemorative cups. As recently as 5 years ago I was bemoaning the fact that there were literally NO 7-11s in my area. There are now around 6 or 7 within 5 or so miles of me. I hate Florida just a TEENY bit less now.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 03, 2012, 07:05:29 PM
We had a Stop-n-Go that was closer to my house. I still have this big easel advertisement with a Coca Cola Santa on each side! I simply asked the worker if I could have it and she said yes!
I bought my comics, and later my 3.2 beer from there.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Gillfan on August 03, 2012, 11:02:10 PM
When I was growing up in NJ the best place to buy comics was the local train station. They had the largest comic and magazine section I had ever seen. It was too far to walk or go on my bike when i was very young so I had to beg my Dad to take me. He would give in about once every two weeks. Writing about it I can still remember the smell; it was a heady mix of candy, tobacco, and fresh ink. The shop is still there in the train station but it is a shadow of its former self.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: neonnoodle on August 04, 2012, 08:31:59 AM
Great stuff!  Yes, those are the little things, those places and memories from childhood that we associate with the goodness of monsterdom...they take on a special importance. 

I still remember odd little bookstores and newsstands, and that general store way up in the California mountains (right above a place called Gull Lake) that had the first FM and the first Eerie I ever knew.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: charp13 on August 04, 2012, 09:52:40 AM
Illoman- Your photo inspired me to spend hours looking for "my store" last night. When I would stay with my grandmother who lived an hour or so away, we would go to a store called Savarino's and I would get comics, Wacky Packages, paper dolls, and monster mags.. My grandma would buy a stack of movie magazines and we would spend a couple hours on Sunday afternoon listening to records (she loved Tom Jones and Engelbert Humperdinck) and reading our respective magazines......ahhhhhhh  :)
What great times! I think she's the reason that I am a super-cool grandma (if I do say so myself) teehee!  So I looked all over the internet, til my eyes watered, and I found out that my special store is now Savarino's restaurant...which is ok, I guess  :) 
Your photo really does say a thousand words, Illoman. Thanks so much for bringing back some more sweet monster memories.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Moonshadow on August 04, 2012, 10:06:19 AM
Wow, Illoman has brought up so many memories here. For me it was all about finding comics, back in those days before comic book stores. That meant going to a lot of different places -book store, grocery stores, liquor stores, small markets. On Saturdays I would hop on my bike and make the circuit - William Brothers grocery store, Book Nook, the meat market (the name escapes me), Broadway Liquors, and then the one that always creeped me out, R&K Liquors. The guys behind the counter were always scowling and they'd yell at you if you took too much time looking at the books. 'Too much time' was probably a minute and a half.

By the time I was 11, we had a 7-11 and a Taco Bell, side by side, only about 5 blocks from our house. It felt like we'd hit the big time.  ;D
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 04, 2012, 10:27:23 AM
Before the comic book shops opened the only places close to my house were Dooley's Pharmacy, 7-11, Stop-N-Go, Kwikie Mart, and downtown was Wilkie's Bookstore, and Bonnett's Bookstore. I remember only going to Bonnett's a few times. They had the Marvel Slurpee cups and assorted toys, pulps, comics, and an "adult" section that actually got raided one time when I was there!! *That* was a hoot! I would save up my lawn mowing money and try to flesh out my Captain America collection by buying from them. I remember my dad trying to dicker with the guy on price "since he's buying so many of them". LOL!

My folks were so cool about me and my brothers' interests while we were growing up. The local shopping mall had an antique show now and then. My folks went through my Conan comic collection when I was at school, wrote down the numbers I had, then went to the antique show and bought about seven or eight back issues I needed! They wrapped them up and gave them to me for Christmas that year. I've never forgotten that...
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 04, 2012, 12:34:42 PM
Illoman- Your photo inspired me to spend hours looking for "my store" last night.

Me too!  I grew up in Muncie, Indiana.  There's a site called "Lost Muncie" with lots of old photos, but alas, no Bob's Store...  :(

I love hearing these stories - thanks, Mike, for starting this.

I was 11-12 years old and would search the numerous (unfortunately) junkyards and alleys to find pop bottles (or "soda" as some might say).  I'd cash them in at Ross' Hardware & Supermarket, just a couple of blocks from Bob's Store.  Less than two bucks would get me an FM (50 cents), a Creepy or Eerie (35 cents), an Eerie Publications gore mag like Horror Tales or Tales of Voodoo (35 cents), and a bottle of Coca-Cola and a Zero candy bar!  I would read and re-read these mags off and on, all month long - till the next bunch arrived at my favorite store, evidently owned by "Bob"!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: charp13 on August 04, 2012, 01:33:31 PM
Well Mike- You've started something!  :)  We're all looking for our stores- Yay!!
UP- My store was in Hillsdale, MI. and I bought the same comics/mags. you bought.....BUT WAIT.....I LOVED Zeros!! They were insanely delicious! I probably couldn't stand the sweetness of one today, but I might go and try to find one.  :)  They were my candy of choice, those and lemon drops (that were sooo scrapey they hurt your tongue!) Please don't tell me you also bought paper dolls, or I'll suspect that we were seperated at birth!!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 04, 2012, 02:10:38 PM
I did not buy paper dolls  ::)...  much.

When I wanted to live dangerously, I would drop SweetTarts into my coke and let them nearly dissolve before I'd drink it.  Yeah, I know - wild man.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Moonshadow on August 04, 2012, 05:48:34 PM
How about mixing two or three different flavors of Slurpee? We called those 'suicides'!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 04, 2012, 06:57:00 PM
Wild woman!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 04, 2012, 09:36:16 PM
I'm glad folks are responding to this thread, because I *too* love reading all these stories. And my candy bar of choice back then was Zero as well!!! My mom must've bought me a thousand of those over the years. That's hilarious!! I think we're all separated at birth! I'm just glad we all found each other here!!!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Moonshadow on August 04, 2012, 09:56:19 PM
I'm glad folks are responding to this thread, because I *too* love reading all these stories. And my candy bar of choice back then was Zero as well!!! My mom must've bought me a thousand of those over the years. That's hilarious!! I think we're all separated at birth! I'm just glad we all found each other here!!!

I have never heard of this Zero bar! I'm wondering if it never made its way out west. SO -what was in it??? I'm dying to know!

My favorite candy bar was probably Baby Ruth, although I did like Three Musketeers and Powerhouse too!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 04, 2012, 09:58:14 PM
I have never heard of this Zero bar! I'm wondering if it never made its way out west. SO -what was in it??? I'm dying to know!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZERO_bar (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZERO_bar)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 04, 2012, 10:17:59 PM
I don't remember the Zero bar as a kid, so I'm guessing they didn't hit Newark, NJ, until Hershey bought them in the mid-'90s. Have never eaten one, but the next time I'm out, I'll try it. (I know I've seen them at the checkouts at Walmart.)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 04, 2012, 10:19:21 PM
I use to put my Zero bar in the fridge.  I always pictured it being cold anyway, because of the name - you know, like, zero degrees.  Yes, I was weird.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 04, 2012, 10:28:23 PM
WAS?
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 04, 2012, 11:07:44 PM
Still there!
(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6170/6192305536_4ba4131e8c_z.jpg)
The magazine racks are just to the right of the front door.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 05, 2012, 01:18:13 AM
[That is a cool pic!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 07, 2012, 04:59:36 PM
How about mixing two or three different flavors of Slurpee? We called those 'suicides'!

I did that today.........but I keep them in layers. I don't let them mush all together until melting makes it inevitable. That way you enjoy each flavor, then ALL the flavors mixed as you get to the bottom.

Yes, I'm a Slurpee geek.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 07, 2012, 05:05:38 PM
Count, that is *really* a blast from the past! Kudos to the town for keeping it as it appears it was back then. Love the art deco style lettering.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 07, 2012, 07:01:16 PM
Count, that is *really* a blast from the past! Kudos to the town for keeping it as it appears it was back then. Love the art deco style lettering.

I doubt the city gives a hoot. The signage is probably still the same because the current owners don't have the money to replace it.
 
Here's the not-so-glorious side entrance, which puts you directly in the back, at the pharmacist's. This is also where people waiting for the crosstown bus into Irvington and Union had to wait outside. There used to be a bus stop, but drunk drivers kept smashing into it!

(http://www.newarkhistory.com/DSC01825.jpeg)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Illoman on August 07, 2012, 07:09:55 PM
I doubt the city gives a hoot. The signage is probably still the same because the current owners don't have the money to replace it.

Where is this located?
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on August 08, 2012, 12:37:45 AM
Where is this located?
Brick City, a.k.a. Newark, NJ.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Moonshadow on August 08, 2012, 09:35:16 AM
I did that today.........but I keep them in layers. I don't let them mush all together until melting makes it inevitable. That way you enjoy each flavor, then ALL the flavors mixed as you get to the bottom.

Yes, I'm a Slurpee geek.

Whatever helps you get through the heat, pal.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on August 08, 2012, 11:32:24 AM
When I was growing up in NJ the best place to buy comics was the local train station. They had the largest comic and magazine section I had ever seen. It was too far to walk or go on my bike when i was very young so I had to beg my Dad to take me. He would give in about once every two weeks. Writing about it I can still remember the smell; it was a heady mix of candy, tobacco, and fresh ink.

Mmmmmm! A great smell to be sure. I've always loved train stations! What town was this?

 ???

Great stuff!  Yes, those are the little things, those places and memories from childhood that we associate with the goodness of monsterdom...they take on a special importance. 

I still remember odd little bookstores and newsstands....

I agree! Those are things I remember too.

 ;)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on August 08, 2012, 11:38:26 AM
...I would get comics, Wacky Packages, paper dolls, and monster mags....

Do you still collect the Wacky Packages or other items?

 ???

For me it was all about finding comics, back in those days before comic book stores. That meant going to a lot of different places -book store, grocery stores, liquor stores, small markets. On Saturdays I would hop on my bike and make the circuit - William Brothers grocery store, Book Nook, the meat market (the name escapes me), Broadway Liquors, and then the one that always creeped me out, R&K Liquors. The guys behind the counter were always scowling and they'd yell at you if you took too much time looking at the books. 'Too much time' was probably a minute and a half.

I like how you and other kids in those days had the independence to just get on your bike and go to wherever you needed to go - as opposed to kids these days who are driven everywhere by their parents.

 ::)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Street Worm on August 08, 2012, 12:09:26 PM
Always amazed how unsupervised I was as a tyke-
Going where I wanted on my bike, dropped off for a day at the movies...
we'd even get to go off on our own at big stores & (open air) malls-

& I had strict parents!  :P

different times, I guess-
my kids couldn't do it & I wasn't all that strict~  ;)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on August 08, 2012, 12:13:07 PM
I was 11-12 years old and would search the numerous (unfortunately) junkyards and alleys to find pop bottles (or "soda" as some might say).

It was pop in my neck of the woods as well. But the deposit was only two cents. Of course, packs of cards were only a nickel and comics were only a dime and then twelve cents.

In London I used to mainly patronize the following outlets for my comics, Mad, Drag Cartoons and Warren magazines:

Les' Variety -  a block away.
Ken's Variety - four blocks away in the other direction.
United Cigar Store - downtown at Dundas & Richmond, the main intersection of London
News Depot - downtown at Dundas & Wellington
Canadian National Institute for the Blind kiosk on Richmond & Queen
Canadian National Institute for the Blind kiosk in the market building
Davis Variety and Lunch on Richmond across from St. Peter's school

These outlets would have all of the comics and magazines I wanted.

 8)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 08, 2012, 04:59:04 PM
Yep!  Two cents here, also.  When it went up to 5, I felt like a millionaire!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Moonshadow on August 08, 2012, 06:20:48 PM
I was 11-12 years old and would search the numerous (unfortunately) junkyards and alleys to find pop bottles (or "soda" as some might say).  I'd cash them in at Ross' Hardware & Supermarket, just a couple of blocks from Bob's Store.  Less than two bucks would get me an FM (50 cents), a Creepy or Eerie (35 cents), an Eerie Publications gore mag like Horror Tales or Tales of Voodoo (35 cents), and a bottle of Coca-Cola and a Zero candy bar!  I would read and re-read these mags off and on, all month long - till the next bunch arrived at my favorite store, evidently owned by "Bob"!

Bottles were a major supplement to my allowance as well. Comics were 20 or 25 cents when I started my 'crusade'. The refunds from those bottles really helped! I'd hunt down my books, then hit Taco Bell and get lunch for under a buck, and top it off with Hostess Cupcakes from the 7-11 next door! Those were the days, weren't they?

I like how you and other kids in those days had the independence to just get on your bike and go to wherever you needed to go - as opposed to kids these days who are driven everywhere by their parents.
 ::)

It was a very different experience growing up in the 70s than it is now. No one ever worried about kids getting kidnapped. My parents kept us in line but gave us a lot of freedom too. I'm glad I had a chance to grow up like that, to plan my own days and find a way to do all the things I wanted to do. Also, I had to work for what I wanted -collecting bottles, riding all over town. I earned those comics, and I treasured them.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Unknown Primate on August 08, 2012, 06:31:16 PM
When I was "growing up", comic books were 12 cents, with the big annual issues being a quarter.  I was dismayed when they went up to 15 cents!!  A few of my older neighbors would sometimes save bottles for me - I'd repay them by mowing their yard or something, even though they'd insist I didn't have to.  What nice people.  Never told them I was buying gruesome monster magazines with the cash!
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Scatter on August 08, 2012, 06:36:53 PM
Bottles were a major supplement to my allowance as well. Comics were 20 or 25 cents when I started my 'crusade'. The refunds from those bottles really helped! I'd hunt down my books, then hit Taco Bell and get lunch for under a buck, and top it off with Hostess Cupcakes from the 7-11 next door! Those were the days, weren't they?

It was a very different experience growing up in the 70s than it is now. No one ever worried about kids getting kidnapped. My parents kept us in line but gave us a lot of freedom too. I'm glad I had a chance to grow up like that, to plan my own days and find a way to do all the things I wanted to do. Also, I had to work for what I wanted -collecting bottles, riding all over town. I earned those comics, and I treasured them.


Exactly how I would describe my experience growing up in the 70s. Better days for sure.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on November 17, 2012, 06:24:35 PM
One of the characteristic features of the New York City streetscape during the traditional monster kid/baby boomer years was something called a candy store. The traditional New York City candy store was a combination of a more modern convenience store with a newstand and lunch counter/soda fountain. As such, they sold everything from milk, bread and cigarettes to soda pop, comic books, baseball cards, school supplies, model kits, carded rack toys, bubble gum and penny candy in a space much smaller than in a present day 7-11 store.  People on their way to work would grab a coffee and buttered roll with a newspaper at their local candy store in the mornings. Newspapers were a particularly big business since New Yorkers would buy as many as two or three newspapers per day in the early sixties. As such the candy stores were badly hurt by the New York newspaper strike of 1962-63.

Here's an excellent writeup by a fellow whose parents operated Harry's Candy Store on 164th Street in Flushing, Queens:

Harry's Candy Store (http://gordonsander.com/2011/06/chapter-1-the-candy-store/)

A candy shop still in operation to the present day is this one at Lexington Avenue and 83rd Street in Manhattan:

(http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n289/billyboy71_2006/Walking%20In%20a%20Dairy%20Wonderland%20with%20Ayersian%20in%20NYC/IMG_2673.jpg)

Unfortunately though I understand it no longer has kid friendly prices since the Upper East Side neighbourhood in which it's located has been yuppified for decades.

There was a store exactly like one of these New York City candy stores on Richmond Street in my hometown of London, Ontario.  It was directly across the street from St. Peter's School where I was obligated by my parents to attend extracurricular language classes between 4:00 and 5:30 Saturday afternoons. Davis Variety was its name. It had the obligatory lunch counter which the fellow worked himself. I was never drawn to get anything at the lunch counter though (not that I would have had the money anyway of course). Unlike the lunch counters at the downtown Metropolitan, Kresge and Woolworths stores a few blocks away, it was pretty spartan and dingy and just didn't appeal to me. Mr. Davis himself was almost a comic book caricature of the old guy working a hot grill and his lunch counter never seemed to have any customers on Saturday afternoons. He probably got the bulk of his business frying up breakfast and lunch for the teachers at St. Peter's. And of course everybody smoked and read newspapers in those days including the teachers and the respective bishops, priests and staff at the adjacent St. Peter's Basilica and St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral. 

The Davis Variety had most everything else to tempt a young boy with a quarter or two in his pocket though. It was one of the very few stores I knew that stocked Black Cat Bubble Gum which was licorice flavoured and was somehow chewier than Bazooka or even Dubble Bubble. I remember happily chewing on Black Cat and blowing black bubbles for hours!

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/ABlackCatgum.jpg)

I also very clearly remember buying baseball cards at Davis' every so often:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%202/Baseballwrapper.jpg)

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%202/29-07-201245506PM.jpg)

The wooden magazine rack was located on the other side of the store from the lunch counter and was thus well situated to sneak a peak at the insides of the titty mags. There would of course have been something wrong with any little boy who wouldn't glance at pictures of bare naked ladies given a chance. In fact, I'm sure that the priests from St. Peter's and St. Paul's, if not the bishops themselves, would have been taking the occasional peak as well.

It was at the Davis magazine rack though where I first encountered Green Lantern 26, 28 and 29 and the excitement I felt seeing those issues for the first time is still seared in my mind to this very day. In fact, I'm sure those comics are the reason why I still remember Bill's so vividly.

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/Comics/GreenLantern26.jpg)

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/Comics/14-06-2012114624PM.jpg)

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/Comics/21-06-2012114247PM.jpg)

While St. Peter's and St. Paul's cathedrals are still there, 1979 was the last year for St. Peter's School and the Davis Variety has also been gone for decades. Sadly, I never got to sample a cheeseburger and shake at Davis'. You never know what you've got till it's gone.

 :(
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Count_Zirock on November 18, 2012, 12:14:38 AM
It was a very different experience growing up in the 70s than it is now. No one ever worried about kids getting kidnapped. My parents kept us in line but gave us a lot of freedom too. I'm glad I had a chance to grow up like that, to plan my own days and find a way to do all the things I wanted to do. Also, I had to work for what I wanted -collecting bottles, riding all over town. I earned those comics, and I treasured them.
It's really sad to think that kids today just will never know that kind of freedom. I think of a joke that Woody Allen used to tell in his stand-up act back in the '60s:

"My parents told me that if a man ever pulled up to me, and offered me candy and comic books if I got in the car with him-- GO!"

If someone told that joke today, people would be outraged and horrified! But, back then, it was funny, because, of course, no parent would ever say such a thing.

I think about how, just before I got my driver's permit, I used to walk up to "The Avenue" (South Orange Avenue in Newark) and hit up the newsstands for magazines, the R.H. Lincoln 5 & 10 for new "Star Wars" figures and model kits, and walk home with everything crammed into my backpack. Maybe the next day I'd hit the OTHER avenue (18th Avenue, at the far end of our street), and see what some of the smaller newsstands and stores had in stock. And, I was a teenager now-- I didn't have to worry about the occasional teen thug that might have otherwise tried to swipe my haul because I was just a little kid. In fact, now I could STOP those guys doing it to little kids. I didn't even need to fight them, I just had to threaten to tell their moms! And the ones whose parents I didn't know? Well, I was a "husky" kid. Like I used to ask them, "You really want 160-lbs. tap-dancing on your breastbone?"
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: neonnoodle on November 18, 2012, 09:45:45 AM
So haunting that most of these places where we discovered these magazines and monster things, they're all gone or replaced in some way.  The Star Market in Monterey Park, that was a brick building, really old structure, and they had lots of DC comics and the "7-Up" candy bars that actually had 7 flavors in different sections.  The TG&Y store, sort of a five and dime, they had AHI monsters, comics and other cool things.  And the old Alhambra Bookstore on Main Street in Alhambra, long gone now, but in their day they were a huge bookstore with everything, including Warren publications, graphic novels and specialty books, in addition to the basic book categories.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: marsattacks666 on November 18, 2012, 10:01:35 AM
The 7-11 that I used to ride my bike to to get comics and Marvel Slurpee cups shut down a while back, and reopened as a Hostess outlet store. Now it's an abandoned building. Sigh...


How sad.  :( :( 
It seems all our childhood places are slowly disappearing.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on November 18, 2012, 02:37:20 PM
It's really sad to think that kids today just will never know that kind of freedom.

So haunting that most of these places where we discovered these magazines and monster things, they're all gone or replaced in some way.

Yes, so very sad on both counts.

 :(

Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on November 18, 2012, 02:57:05 PM
...and the "7-Up" candy bars that actually had 7 flavors in different sections.


Wow, seven flavours! Cool!

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%202/sevenupbar.jpg)

Neilson's Jersey Milk Treasures was a somewhat similar Canadian chocolate bar but it too is sadly gone:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/JerseyMilk.jpg)

 :(
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: neonnoodle on November 18, 2012, 03:46:48 PM
Yes...back to that haunting feeling that we get thinking about places we once visited...buildings long ago razed and built over with new plastic constructions which now themselves are showing signs of age!

It's weird because in memories, these things and places exist so vividly, as if they're still around.  But they're only echoes.

You know what really lights up my day? Looking at my small box of Imagineering goodies...holding a tube of Vampire Blood from 1970, for example, or charging up the glow fangs and watching them glow in the dark.  I feel lucky to be able to do that, to hold a little piece of the 1970's that I remember.  Same thing with an issue of Famous Monsters, or an old Marvel (or DC or Gold Key!) comic book.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: RedKing on November 18, 2012, 08:52:04 PM
For me the store was a tiny Mom and Pop 5 and dime called Haynor's run by Mr and Mrs Haynor. Mrs Haynor made home baked goodies which were displayed in a glass counter and they sold all sorts of stuff, but what interested me most was the HUGE magazine and comic rack on the back wall! Like Gillfan's train station shop, Haynor's smelled like ink, tobacco and fresh baked goodies. I used to get FM, Creepy,Eerie and Charlton and DC horror comics there all the time in the 70s and 80s, Unfortunately the Haynors retired around 1985 and sold the store off and it is now a Chinese restaraunt. :( There was also a hobby shop my Dad and I frequented in the local mall for years that also smelled like tobacco. Man this thread actually brings a tear to my eye remembering my store and hearing everyone else's similar tales. It was truly a different and better era growing up in the 60s-80s. :'(
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on November 19, 2012, 06:12:14 PM
There was a store exactly like one of these New York City candy stores on Richmond Street in my hometown of London, Ontario....I don't clearly remember the name but it may have been Bill's Tobacco Shop or Variety.


I tracked the name of the store down today. It was Davis Variety.

Here's a traditional New York City candy store that's been operating in the Borough's Park area of Brooklyn for well over 75 years:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%202/BoroughPark.jpg) 

 ;)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on June 13, 2013, 10:09:40 AM
This picture of Almond's Ice Cream Parlour in the English Bay neighbourhood of Vancouver, British Columbia circa 1920 meets the standards the Vancouver Archives sets for historic:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/Almondslarge_zpse0024546.jpg)

Certainly a nice place to buy ice cream, peanuts, popcorn and cigars anyway!

 8)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Wich2 on June 13, 2013, 10:51:07 AM
Great stuff, Mike & gang!

I've tried in vain to find a picture of the long-gone Morey's Newstand, on the corner in Defiance, Ohio were I got much of my genre fix.

A quick walk from our church, that's where we'd go to get the Sunday paper. Mom liked the NY Daily News for its crime feature stories; I loved its great funnies section (full-page DICK TRACY on the cover, etc.)

That's where I saw my first FM, the 1970 Fearbook, and asked for it for my 12th birthday. Spinracks were packed with gems like scifi and horror anthologies. And there were tons of comics, including for a few wonderful years, my favorite version of same, the Treasuries.

Like most of such places in that era, it had a creaky screen door and smelled of the wood floor, tobacco, candy - and paper!

Great memories.
-Craig
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: horrorhunter on June 13, 2013, 01:46:34 PM
     I made the rounds to all the dime stores and newsstands in my home town like everyone else. I grew up in the '60s/early '70s so I picked up lots of toys, models, comics, and monster mags when I could scrounge up the dough. When I first started buying comics they were 12 cents, and a really big candy bar was 5 cents. Sodas in a GLASS bottle were a dime. I could get an Ice Cream Sandwich for a dime. I remember opening up the floor cooler with the sliding glass top to get cold goodies and the glass always fogged up in summer since there was little or no air conditioning, only fans. I could take a buck and buy a Dr. Pepper, a Fifth Avenue candy bar, and a whole stack of comics, and still have money left.
     My family used to go on vacation to Florida every year. We always went through St. Petersburg and stayed for a couple of days because my Dad was stationed down there at Drew Field during World War II. We would always go to an awesome bookstore called Haslams. That store was huge, like a maze. They had new and used books, as well as comics and monster mags. I always loaded up on cool reading material for the rest of the trip. Many of the hardback monster movie tomes in my collection were purchased off the bargain tables at Haslams Books. As far as I know Haslams is still there. I was there about 8 years ago and bought Walking With Dinosaurs (book), Charles Addams' Mother Goose, and three Conan paperbacks from the '70s. That is one cool bookstore.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Dr. Madd on June 14, 2013, 01:52:44 AM
Got my first monster, second hand. a switchable head grim reaper.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on June 14, 2013, 08:53:08 AM
Huh?! Do you mean an MPC Pop-Top? Where and when?

 ???
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on December 08, 2018, 07:22:21 PM
I found some really good pictures of the London, Ontario of my formative years. The only thing they lack is me!

Here's a picture of the Arena Dairy Bar on York Street sometime in the early fifties:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/LondonArenaDairyBar_zps31af5687.jpg)

Sadly I have no memory of this old time dairy bar but it must have been located right by the old London Arena a few blocks away from our house. I have really fond memories of going to the London Arena for the Labatt Brewing Company's employee Xmas party with cake, ice cream, cookies, a magician and finally Santa Claus with a specially wrapped present for each and every kid in attendance!

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/arena2_zpsc79794e8.jpg)

The London Arena also featured roller skating and wrestling with grapplers such as Whipper Billy Watson, Johnny Valentine, D ick "The Bulldog" Brower and Sweet Daddy Siki in the fifties and sixties. I also attended a concert by Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention in the London Arena in 1973 the day after partying with my buddies in Toronto the previous evening prior to the 1973 Grey Cup tilt between the Edmonton Eskimos and the Ottawa Rough Riders.

Robb's Dairy Bar was located two very short blocks away from where my card collecting buddy Tony lived. Drat, but it closed sometime in 1958(?) and I don't remember ever noticing it.

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/RobbsDairyBar_zps05fb16b7.jpg)

One of the things that I do remember from those early years and sorely miss is milk delivery in returnable refillable bottles!

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/milkman2_zps0b0e0e18.jpg)

I remember Borden's, Silverwood Dairy, London Pure Milk Company and Mark Ayres Dairy delivery vehicles prowling London's leafy streets:

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/MilktruckB_zpsa3d05a54.jpg)

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/MilkTruckS_zpse2b71108.jpg)

My home town dairy, Silverwood, grew by acquisition to become the largest dairy in Canada by the late sixties and still provided home delivery service in certain markets well into the seventies(eighties?).

Both Silverwood Dairy and the London Pure Milk Company still had horse drawn milk wagons wending their way along London streets until sometime in the mid-sixties. It was back in 1963-64 that my mother and I saw that the train car being backed into the Labatt Breweries plant had somehow collided with a Silverwood's horse much to the detriment of the latter. Her uncharitable comment at the time was that Labatt didn't want people to drink milk.

Here are a couple of pictures of Silverwood's milk wagons:

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/SilverwoodsCart_zps2326ee5a.jpg)

 (https://hosting.photobucket.com/images/g434/Balticprince/Milk_Wagon.jpg?width=1920&height=1080&fit=bounds)

Here's a picture of a more modern sixties state-of-the-art London Pure Milk Company wagon:

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/LondonPureMilkCo_zpsc3fce177.jpg)

We also had home bread delivery from London's own Lewis Bakeries for a while when we lived in Manor Park on the edge of London in the fifties. Many a housewife's household budget was blown succumbing to the pastry temptations proferred that day by the bread man! Best of all though my buddy Dave had a job helping the Jackson's Bakeries bread man make his deliveries Saturday mornings. Talk about a marriage made in heaven! All the delivery man had to do was drive since he had a young boy doing most of the work for him, and Dave got to ride around in a very cool bread delivery truck and run to each house on the route carrying bread in a basket! I'll have to ask Dave whether he received anything more than free tarts and other pastries for his efforts....

I also have a hazy memory of having journeyed to the beach with my mother and sister on the London & Port Stanley Railway one summer day in 1957(?). It would have been on an interurban car like this beautifully restored one that's part of the collection of the Halton County Radial Railway Museum:

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/LondonampPortStanley_zps23774d55.jpg)

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/LondonPort_zps69f3e1c3.jpg)

Here's a picture of the main Richmond Street and Dundas Street intersection of London from the late fifties. I bought many of my comics in the United Cigar Store which was on the southeast corner of that intersection.

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/1452181_415827255210244_1377567151_n_zps907c95a9.jpg)

Here's a great view of the north side of Dundas Street shot from just slightly to the east of that corner:

(https://hosting.photobucket.com/images/g434/Balticprince/Zellers.jpg?width=1920&height=1080&fit=bounds)

Here's a good picture circa late fifties of the Kresge store on the north side of Dundas Street just west of Richmond Street:

 (http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/Kresge_zps52be753c.jpg)

That was the store where I first saw a Marx Great Garloo in 1961 and discovered the Aurora monster model kits a year or so later. Just beyond it the Metropolitan(Met) store can be seen. The Met's lunch counter did such a thriving business that they had a satellite take-out counter at the front of the store where office workers could quickly grab a hamburger, hot dog, French fries, coffee, donut, etc. to go. Across the street to the left in the picture was a Woolworth store. The Zellers store was directly to the right of the camera man.

My mother used to take me in tow and haunt them all. I lived for hitting her up for a steel bowl of ice cream at one of the lunch counters after she was fully shopped out. I remember the ice cream being served in a stainless steel dish with a cardboard insert. 

And here's a picture from the fifties of Cowan Hardware on Dundas basically across the street from the Metropolitan store. I used to visit Cowan's to admire toys and model kits.

(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/cf/4e/19/cf4e197ccf6a2e1ea7f11cbca71c0815.jpg)

Cowan's was also where I raced my Monogram Ferrari slot cars after a slot car track was installed upstairs in 1965(?). Good times! Just out of the picture was the Ontario Conservatory of Music where I lugged my accordion on the bus for my weekly lessons. Not entirely good times.

Look at the riot of neon in this picture looking west along Dundas Street circa 1962!

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/DundasStreet_zps965b9c3c.jpg)

Finally from downtown here's a great shot of the Victoria Theater circa 1956 which was just off Dundas on a side street.

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General Album 3/Victoria_zps9166987c.jpg)

The Victoria was a classic grindhouse with a balcony from which kids would fling flattened popcorn boxes onto the poor unfortunates below. This of course would prompt warnings from chagrined ushers that throwing objects from the balcony was strictly forbidden.

The Hyland was my neighbourhood theatre on Wharncliffe Road just down from Ken's Variety where in the early sixties I used to take in Saturday matinee double features with a cartoon for $0.20:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/Hyland.jpg)

Here it is these days:

(http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/hyland1.jpg)

:)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on September 16, 2020, 11:51:53 AM
Any more recollections of your home town from back in the day?

 ???
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on September 16, 2020, 12:01:05 PM
I found this photo today while cleaning up my studio. It was taken circa 1978-79. I was taking a photography class in college and we had to do an "environmental piece", showing someone in their environment. The bookstore to the left in this photo is where I got the majority of my Famous Monsters and Castle of Frankensteins fresh off the news stand. It was located in a strip mall in north Dayton, right in front of the apartment complex where my Grandma lived. We would drive across town to see her, and it was my one shot at getting a monster mag. For whatever reason the drug stores where we lived didn't carry monster mags. So it was a good thing to go see Grandma. I enjoyed seeing her and enjoyed getting a new issue of FM. I had to have a bag when I purchased anything because if my folks saw it they would inevitably find it and throw it away. I rescued a few issues from the trash.

The shop itself was one of those stores just *crammed* to the walls with newspapers, paperbacks, magazines, maps, etc. There wasn't room for many customers all at once at any given time. Luckily whenever I went there they weren't busy. That store was very important to this monster kid, and I'm glad I took the photo when I did!

Here's an unobscured picture of that north Dayton newsstand:

(https://hosting.photobucket.com/images/g434/Balticprince/Bookstore.jpg?width=1920&height=1080&fit=bounds)

 8)
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Mike Scott on September 16, 2020, 03:45:08 PM
Here's an unobscured picture:

Looks the same, to me.
Title: Re: An historic place to me!
Post by: Hepcat on September 16, 2020, 07:37:41 PM
No longer! I went the extra mile.

 ;)